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GOP senators reject talk of defunding Mueller probe

Senate Republicans are shooting down the possibility of defunding the investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller.

Several GOP senators said on Tuesday that they wouldn't support a move to crack down on Mueller's investigation, which is looking at Russia's interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow. 

"I would not support that. He needs to continue to investigate. I have confidence in Bob Mueller," Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMnuchin pulls out of Saudi conference The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns On The Money: Treasury official charged with leaking info on ex-Trump advisers | Trump to seek 5 percent budget cut from Cabinet members | Mnuchin to decide by Thursday on attending Saudi conference MORE (R-Ariz.) told reporters.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters Congress moves to ensure the greater availability of explosives detecting dogs in the US McConnell sets key Kavanaugh vote for Friday MORE (Mo.), a member GOP leadership, noted he's not "concerned" that lawmakers would try to defund Mueller, but added, "I'm also not for it."

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Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMcConnell: GOP could try to repeal ObamaCare again after midterms Comey donates maximum amount to Democratic challenger in Virginia House race Live coverage: McSally clashes with Sinema in Arizona Senate debate MORE (R-Ariz.), who like Flake has been a vocal critic of the president, said that he would "oppose [that] and so would the American people."

The focus on Mueller's funding comes amid reports that former  White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon urged President Trump to take a more aggressive stance against the investigation, including urging Republicans to cut off funding for the special counsel's office.

Sources close to Bannon denied to The Hill that he has spoken to Trump about Mueller. Those same sources added that Bannon does want to see the president draw more attention to the special counsel's funding.

Mueller announced the first charges in his investigation on Monday, unsealing a 12-count indictment against former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and his businesses associate, Richard Gates.

But any push to defund Mueller appears unlikely to gain traction in Congress, where Mueller, a former FBI director, is widely respected. 

Senate GOP leadership has been wary of wading into Mueller's probe and would likely need 60 votes to limit or nix his funding.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Poll finds Dems prioritize health care, GOP picks lower taxes when it's time to vote The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan MORE (R-Ky.), asked about the charges against Manafort on Tuesday, said "the special counsel has his job to do."

Though Mueller's probe is overseen by the Justice Department, the investigation is funded out of a permanent Treasury Department account. 

That would give lawmakers the option of inserting a rider into an appropriations bill or passing a stand-alone bills to limit that funding.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyDisasters become big chunk of U.S. deficit Lawmakers, Wall Street shrug off Trump's escalating Fed attacks Florida politics play into disaster relief debate MORE (R-Ala.), a member of the Appropriations Committee, added that he hadn't heard of any push to go after Mueller's office.

"My basic philosophy is once you have an independent counsel you ought to give them a chance to follow the facts," he said. 

Mueller has to turn over a report to the Justice Department on his expenses. Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) noted he would keep an eye on the spending but didn't want to impede Mueller. 

"I don't want to deny the Justice Department or the special counsel the resources they need. Now I don't want to see them just go hog wild and waste money either, but I don't want to try to do anything to hurt [them]," he said. 

Jonathan Easley contributed.