Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday

Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday
© Keren Carrion

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Poll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (R-Texas) is predicting that Senate Republicans will unveil their tax-reform legislation on Thursday. 

Asked about the bill, Cornyn said the "mark" — or the version drafted by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchOrrin Hatch Foundation seeking million in taxpayer money to fund new center in his honor Mitch McConnell has shown the nation his version of power grab Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Utah Senate votes to scale back Medicaid expansion | Virginia abortion bill reignites debate | Grassley invites drug execs to testify | Conservative groups push back on e-cig crackdown MORE (R-Utah) — would be released Thursday. 

"Yep, well that's the last I heard," said Cornyn, the No. 2 Senate Republican, when asked if Thursday's release date was "for sure."

Spokespeople for Hatch didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on the timing of the bill. 

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Cornyn added that the Finance Committee would start its mark up next week and Republicans are still aiming to pass their tax plan before leaving town for Thanksgiving. 

The timeline, if Republicans stick to it, leaves senators with a tight schedule.

Lawmakers are currently scheduled to leave for the weeklong Thanksgiving break on Nov. 17, just over a week after they will unveil their tax plan. 

But Senate GOP leadership is threatening to keep the chamber in session for part of the break in order to pass the tax legislation. 

Republicans have a narrow path to clearing a bill through the Senate. With 52 seats, they can only afford to lose two GOP senators, if every Democrat votes no, and still let Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceKamala Harris shopping trip stirs Twitter campaign trail debate Pence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech Bill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' MORE break a tie. 

The House unveiled its own tax plan last week, with the House Ways and Means Committee beginning consideration of the bill on Monday.

Republican senators are already laying down goalposts for their own legislation. 

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonSenate approves border bill that prevents shutdown 'Morning Joe' host quizzes Howard Schultz on price of a box of Cheerios Huawei charges escalate Trump fight with China MORE (R-Ark.) is leading a push by conservatives to use the tax plan to repeal ObamaCare’s individual insurance mandate, despite leadership arguing a health-care fight shouldn’t be included in the tax plan. And Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio in Colombia to push for delivery of humanitarian aid to Venezuela On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (R-Fla.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate approves border bill that prevents shutdown Push for paid family leave heats up ahead of 2020 New act can help us grapple with portion of exploding national debt MORE (R-Utah) argue the $600 increase for the child tax credit in the House bill doesn’t go as far as they would like.

GOP senators, including Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger RNC votes to give Trump 'undivided support' ahead of 2020 Sen. Risch has unique chance to guide Trump on foreign policy MORE (Tenn.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority Pence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid MORE (Ariz.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (Ariz.), are also signaling that they are concerned about the impact any tax deal would have on the deficit.