Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday

Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday
© Keren Carrion

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynKavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow Grassley: Kavanaugh accuser 'deserves to be heard' in 'appropriate' manner MORE (R-Texas) is predicting that Senate Republicans will unveil their tax-reform legislation on Thursday. 

Asked about the bill, Cornyn said the "mark" — or the version drafted by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDem rep who met with Kavanaugh accuser: 'She wanted her truth to come out' Senate passes bipartisan bill to curb opioid crisis Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday MORE (R-Utah) — would be released Thursday. 

"Yep, well that's the last I heard," said Cornyn, the No. 2 Senate Republican, when asked if Thursday's release date was "for sure."

Spokespeople for Hatch didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on the timing of the bill. 

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Cornyn added that the Finance Committee would start its mark up next week and Republicans are still aiming to pass their tax plan before leaving town for Thanksgiving. 

The timeline, if Republicans stick to it, leaves senators with a tight schedule.

Lawmakers are currently scheduled to leave for the weeklong Thanksgiving break on Nov. 17, just over a week after they will unveil their tax plan. 

But Senate GOP leadership is threatening to keep the chamber in session for part of the break in order to pass the tax legislation. 

Republicans have a narrow path to clearing a bill through the Senate. With 52 seats, they can only afford to lose two GOP senators, if every Democrat votes no, and still let Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceHillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law Overnight Defense: Trump marks 9/11 anniversary | Mattis says Assad 'has been warned' on chemical weapons | US identifies first remains of returned Korean war troops The Ruth Bader Ginsburg 2018 midterm elections: #Vote4RUTH MORE break a tie. 

The House unveiled its own tax plan last week, with the House Ways and Means Committee beginning consideration of the bill on Monday.

Republican senators are already laying down goalposts for their own legislation. 

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP senators condemn 'vulgar' messages directed at Collins over Kavanaugh GOP turns its fire on Google Overnight Defense: Trump denies report he's looking at Mattis replacements | Inhofe officially gets Armed Services gavel | Trump revives shutdown threat MORE (R-Ark.) is leading a push by conservatives to use the tax plan to repeal ObamaCare’s individual insurance mandate, despite leadership arguing a health-care fight shouldn’t be included in the tax plan. And Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioNYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias House lawmakers urge top intel official to probe national security threat of doctored videos MORE (R-Fla.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care: Opioid legislation passes overwhelmingly | DOJ backs Cigna-Express Scripts merger | Senate passes ban on pharmacy gag clauses US military intervention in Venezuela would be a major mistake The Hill's 12:30 Report — Obama jumps into midterm fight with speech blasting Trump | Trump wants DOJ to probe anonymous writer | Day four of Kavanaugh hearing MORE (R-Utah) argue the $600 increase for the child tax credit in the House bill doesn’t go as far as they would like.

GOP senators, including Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Tenn.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAnother recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us To cure Congress, elect more former military members MORE (Ariz.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGrassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday MORE (Ariz.), are also signaling that they are concerned about the impact any tax deal would have on the deficit.