Strange encouraged to run write-in campaign after Moore allegations

Strange encouraged to run write-in campaign after Moore allegations
© Greg Nash

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (R-Alaska) said Thursday she has talked to Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeDomestic influence campaigns borrow from Russia’s playbook Overnight Defense: Senate bucks Trump with Yemen war vote, resolution calling crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi killing | House briefing on Saudi Arabia fails to move needle | Inhofe casts doubt on Space Force Five things to watch in Mississippi Senate race MORE (R-Ala.) about running a write-in campaign in the wake of an explosive new report that Roy Moore, the GOP candidate for Senate in Alabama, had inappropriate encounters with teenage girls.

Strange challenged and lost to Moore in the Republican primary for the open Alabama Senate seat. His office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Murkowski won reelection in 2010 by running a successful write-in campaign.

Murkowski's comment follows a Washington Post story published Thursday detailing several women's accounts of Moore's pursuit of relationships while they were teenagers.

According to the report, Moore touched Leigh Corfman, then 14, over her bra and underpants when he was 32 and serving as an assistant district attorney. The two never had sexual intercourse, and the incident took place in 1979, according to Corfman.

The newspaper found three other women who said Moore had approached them around a similar time, when they were between the ages of 16 and 18. 

Moore's campaign blasted the report as “the very definition of fake news.”

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Strange was appointed to the Senate seat in February to replace Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ McCabe says he was interviewed by Mueller CNN hires former DOJ spokesperson under Sessions as editor on 2020 campaign MORE.

Moore defeated Strange in a Republican primary runoff in September, and has been heavily favored to win next month’s special election against Democratic nominee Doug Jones.

Republican senators on Thursday largely said that if the report is true, Moore should step aside in the race.

However, Alabama law prohibits a candidate from withdrawing from a race within 76 days of Election Day, meaning Moore is expected to remain on the ballot. It is also unclear whether Strange could run a write-in campaign. 

The Alabama Senate special election will take place on Dec. 12.