Top medical groups come out against GOP plan to repeal ObamaCare mandate

Top medical groups come out against GOP plan to repeal ObamaCare mandate

Top medical groups are voicing their opposition to the decision to include a repeal of ObamaCare’s individual insurance mandate in the Senate version of the GOP tax-reform bill.

"We join together to urge Congress to maintain the individual mandate," the group, which includes Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, American Hospital Association, and American Academy of Family Physicians, wrote in a letter on Tuesday.

"There will be serious consequences if Congress simply repeals the mandate while leaving the insurance reforms in place: millions more will be uninsured or face higher premiums, challenging their ability to access the care they need," they wrote.

The letter was addressed to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellNegotiators remain far apart on coronavirus deal as deadline looms States begin removing Capitol's Confederate statues on their own Skepticism grows over Friday deadline for coronavirus deal MORE (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerGroup of GOP senators back more money for airlines to pay workers GOP super PAC launching August ad blitz Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package MORE (D-N.Y.), Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDemocratic super PAC quotes Reagan in anti-Trump ad set to air on Fox News: 'Are you better off?' Trump lashes out at Reagan Foundation after fundraising request The Memo: Trump's grip on GOP loosens as polls sink MORE (R-Wis.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe Negotiators remain far apart on coronavirus deal as deadline looms Top federal official says more details coming on foreign election interference MORE (D-Calif.).

ADVERTISEMENT

The letter comes after Senate Republicans heeded President Trump's demand to include the repeal of the mandate in the tax-reform bill. 

While the move could drive centrists in Congress away from supporting the plan, repealing the mandate gives Republicans more money to offset the cost of tax cuts, and would fulfill a the seven-year Republican campaign promise to eliminate a core part of former President Obama’s signature health-care law.

Senate Republicans, as well as the White House, are hoping to achieve their first legislative victory since Trump took office in January. 

Republicans in the upper chamber attracted the ire of the White House and their counterparts in the House when they failed to repeal and replace ObamaCare multiple times earlier this year.