Top medical groups come out against GOP plan to repeal ObamaCare mandate

Top medical groups come out against GOP plan to repeal ObamaCare mandate

Top medical groups are voicing their opposition to the decision to include a repeal of ObamaCare’s individual insurance mandate in the Senate version of the GOP tax-reform bill.

"We join together to urge Congress to maintain the individual mandate," the group, which includes Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, American Hospital Association, and American Academy of Family Physicians, wrote in a letter on Tuesday.

"There will be serious consequences if Congress simply repeals the mandate while leaving the insurance reforms in place: millions more will be uninsured or face higher premiums, challenging their ability to access the care they need," they wrote.

The letter was addressed to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says he made 'inadvertent omission' in voting remarks amid backlash These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 WATCH: The Hill recaps the top stories of the week MORE (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerForced deadline spurs drastic tactic in Congress Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Predictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure MORE (D-N.Y.), Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow Kevin McCarthy sold his soul to Donald Trump On The Trail: Retirements offer window into House Democratic mood Stopping the next insurrection MORE (R-Wis.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMan who threatened to kill Ocasio-Cortez, Pelosi pleads guilty to federal charges The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems look to repackage BBB into salvageable bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden clarifies his remarks on Russia MORE (D-Calif.).

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The letter comes after Senate Republicans heeded President Trump's demand to include the repeal of the mandate in the tax-reform bill. 

While the move could drive centrists in Congress away from supporting the plan, repealing the mandate gives Republicans more money to offset the cost of tax cuts, and would fulfill a the seven-year Republican campaign promise to eliminate a core part of former President Obama’s signature health-care law.

Senate Republicans, as well as the White House, are hoping to achieve their first legislative victory since Trump took office in January. 

Republicans in the upper chamber attracted the ire of the White House and their counterparts in the House when they failed to repeal and replace ObamaCare multiple times earlier this year.