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Alabama's senior senator will 'probably' write in candidate rather than vote for Moore

Alabama's senior senator will 'probably' write in candidate rather than vote for Moore

The senior senator from Alabama, Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyOn The Money: Sanders: Democrats considering trillion spending package | Weekly jobless claims rise for first time since April Shelby signals GOP can accept Biden's .5T with more for defense Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior MORE (R), said on Wednesday that he will likely write in a name during next month's Alabama special election rather than support GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore.

"I'll vote Republican but I will probably write in a good candidate," Shelby told reporters when asked about his plans for the Dec. 12 election.

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Senate Republicans are increasing pressure on Moore to withdraw from the race. The Republican candidate is facing multiple allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct toward teenage girls.

Shelby has called on Moore to "seriously consider" dropping out.

"Well it's not a good situation. I wish we had another candidate," Shelby added on Wednesday. Shelby endorsed Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangePandemic proves importance of pharmaceutical innovation The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements MORE (R-Ala.) in the primary race. Strange was defeated by Moore.

Moore remains defiant, saying he plans to stay in the race and that he has done nothing wrong.

It's too late for Republicans to remove Moore's name from the ballot, though leadership is exploring a potential write-in option.

Shelby didn't say whose name he would write in, but noted Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos Garland strikes down Trump-era asylum decisions MORE, who left the Senate to join the administration, would be the "ideal candidate."

GOP senators are warning that if Moore wins they will be legally required to seat him. But he would likely face an ethics investigation that could pave the way for an expulsion vote.