Senate ethics panel resumes Menendez probe after judge declares mistrial

Senate ethics panel resumes Menendez probe after judge declares mistrial
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The Senate Ethics Committee said Thursday that it will resume its probe into Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems Trump lowers refugee goal to 30,000, he must meet it Blame Senate, not FBI, for Kavanaugh travesty MORE (D-N.J.) after his bribery and corruption case ended in a mistrial.

"In 2012, the committee initiated a preliminary inquiry into alleged misconduct by Senator Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems Trump lowers refugee goal to 30,000, he must meet it Blame Senate, not FBI, for Kavanaugh travesty MORE. In early 2013, consistent with its precedent and in consideration of the Department of Justice's criminal investigation, the committee deferred its inquiry. At this time, the committee intends to resume its process," the committee said.

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They noted that the committee would not make additional public statements about its probe "except in accordance with committee rules."

The announcement comes after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRand Paul blocking Trump counterterrorism nominee On The Money: Trump, Senate leaders to huddle on border wall funding | Fed bank regulator walks tightrope on Dodd-Frank | Koch-backed groups blast incentives for corporations after Amazon deal Congress is going to make marijuana moves MORE (R-Ky.) publicly called on the ethics panel to immediately investigate Menendez following the mistrial.

"His trial shed light on serious accusations of violating the public’s trust as an elected official, as well as potential violations of the Senate’s Code of Conduct," McConnell said.

Menendez's bribery and corruption case ended with the judge declaring a mistrial on Thursday after jurors were unable to come to a consensus on the felony charges after days of deliberating.

The decision is largely considered a win for Menendez, with 10 jurors favoring acquitting him on the charges, while two did not.