The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill

Senate Republicans are poised to pass a massive tax-reform plan.

Leaders had hoped to pass the bill this week but momentum stalled Thursday night with a handful of GOP senators pushing for changes to address the bill's impact on the deficit and its treatment of so-called pass through businesses.

But changes to the bill won support from Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonKavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow House panel advances DHS cyber vulnerabilities bills MORE (R-Wis.) and Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesCongress passes bill to require Senate campaign filings to be made electronically Congress just failed our nation’s veterans when it comes to medical marijuana Sanders: Public should be ‘very concerned’ about election security in 2018 MORE (R-Mont.) who wanted better treatment for businesses that are not corporations.

Another proposal being considered would reduce the size of the $1.4 trillion tax package by $350 billion to win over Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (R-Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGrassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday MORE (R-Ariz.), who have concerns about the deficit. But that change is not popular with House conservatives.

Early Friday afternoon, Flake said he was "pleased to announce" he could support the legislation in its current form, appearing to give Republicans their necessary 50 votes.

Corker is the lone Republican to oppose the bill.

Once it clears the Senate, lawmakers would then have to reconcile it with the House tax-reform package, which has key differences, and pass it through both chambers before delivery to the White House by year's end.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

This list was last updated on Dec. 1 at 5:01 p.m. Latest updates: Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday White House says Kavanaugh ready to testify over 'false allegation' MORE (Maine) Jeff Flake (Ariz.), Ron Johnson (Wis.), and Steve Daines (Mont.).

 

No (1)

Sen. Bob Corker (Tenn.) — Corker wanted a "trigger" that would raise taxes if revenue projections fell short, but that proposal failed to meet Senate rules. Leaders floated but eventually rejected an offer to scale back the cuts by hundreds of billions of dollars. “This is yet another tough vote. I am disappointed. I wanted to get to 'yes.' But at the end of the day, I am not able to cast aside my fiscal concerns and vote for legislation that I believe, based on the information I currently have, could deepen the debt burden on future generations," Corker said in a statement Friday.

 

Likely yes (8)

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP senators condemn 'vulgar' messages directed at Collins over Kavanaugh GOP turns its fire on Google Overnight Defense: Trump denies report he's looking at Mattis replacements | Inhofe officially gets Armed Services gavel | Trump revives shutdown threat MORE (Ark.) — Cotton is likely a "yes" vote. "Every income group under the Senate bill will see a tax cut," Cotton told CBS News's "Face the Nation."

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerEPA signs off on rule exempting farmers from reporting emissions GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE The real reason Scott Pruitt is gone: Putting a key voting bloc at risk MORE (Neb.) — Fischer is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordOutdated global postal system hurts US manufacturers Tech mobilizes to boost election security State Department unit created to fight foreign election interference still waiting on funding: report MORE (Okla.) — Lankford said Wednesday he would back the bill if it includes a "backstop" that would raise rates if revenue fails to meet expectations. “So yes, I am on board with this bill because I want to see the good economic growth that’s coming with it, but I also want to make sure we’re protecting future taxpayers as well in debt and deficit,” he told "CBS This Morning."

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care: Opioid legislation passes overwhelmingly | DOJ backs Cigna-Express Scripts merger | Senate passes ban on pharmacy gag clauses US military intervention in Venezuela would be a major mistake The Hill's 12:30 Report — Obama jumps into midterm fight with speech blasting Trump | Trump wants DOJ to probe anonymous writer | Day four of Kavanaugh hearing MORE (Utah) — Lee is seeking an increase in the child tax credit and is introducing an amendment on that issue with Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioNYT says it was unfair on Haley curtain story Rubio defends Haley over curtains story: Example of media pushing bias House lawmakers urge top intel official to probe national security threat of doctored videos MORE (R-Fla.).

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general Tougher Russia sanctions face skepticism from Senate Republicans Farm groups fear Trump aid won’t fix trade damage MORE (Kan.) — Moran told Fox News on Tuesday he "expects to vote 'yes.' " Moran previously raised concerns about the repeal of the individual mandate and the bill's impact on the deficit.

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) — Rubio is seeking an increase in the child tax credit with Sen. Mike Lee (Utah).

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseGrassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt Bill Kristol building 'war machine' to challenge Trump in 2020 primary Rand Paul ramps up his alliance with Trump MORE (Neb.) — Sasse is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungDems seek ways to block Trump support for Saudi-led coalition in Yemen Indiana senator delivering quilt to Trump from woman who says Holy Spirit inspired gift Overnight Defense: Officials rush to deny writing anonymous op-ed | Lawmakers offer measure on naming NATO headquarters after McCain | US, India sign deal on sharing intel MORE (Ind.) — "I am highly probable to vote for this," Young told The Indianapolis Star on Wednesday. "Of course, it’s subject to an amendment process on the floor. I still need to take a look at what sort of amendments are offered. But I’m pleased with the work product."

 

Yes (43)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke Restoring our national parks would be a bipartisan win for Congress MORE (Tenn.) — Alexander told USA Today he supports the tax plan and using it to repeal the individual mandate.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTrump privately calls Mattis ‘Moderate Dog’: report Push to change wildlife act sparks lobbying blitz House and Senate negotiators reach agreement on water infrastructure bill MORE (Wyo.) — Barrasso told Fox News the Senate GOP tax bill would create a "simpler, fairer" tax system.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Mo.) — Blunt told NBC's "Meet the Press" that "we've had eight years of economic stagnation for hardworking families and this tax bill, I think, creates the opportunity to move dramatically beyond that."

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanOvernight Defense: Duncan Hunter refusing to step down from committees | Trump awards Medal of Honor to widow of airman | Pentagon names pick for Mideast commander Trump awards posthumous Medal of Honor to family of fallen Air Force sergeant GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (Ark.) — Boozman voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrGraham: Mueller is going to be allowed to finish investigation Trump authorizes sanctions against foreign governments that interfere in US elections Hillicon Valley: Google takes heat from Trump, Congress | US cracking down on foreign hackers | Sanders steps up Amazon attack | Analysts predict iPhone prices would rise if production moved to US MORE (N.C.) — Burr voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoThis week: Democrats pledge ‘sparks’ in Kavanaugh hearing Congress faces September scramble on spending California passes bill to ban controversial drift net fishing MORE (W.Va.) — “For West Virginians and so many Americans across the country, the status quo just isn’t working, and this is our opportunity to change it,” Capito said in a statement.

Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOutdated global postal system hurts US manufacturers GOP eyes another shot at ObamaCare repeal after McCain’s death Overnight Defense: Push to rename Senate building for McCain sparks GOP backlash | Pentagon has no plans to suspend future Korea war games | Mattis rejects plan to privatize Afghan War MORE (La.) — Cassidy said in a floor speech that under the Senate tax bill his constituents “will increase their take-home pay, they'll have higher wages, they will have a better life.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. 

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranGOP Senate candidate to African Americans: Stop begging for 'government scraps' Trump endorses Hyde-Smith in Mississippi Senate race GOP Senate candidate doubles down on Robert E. Lee despite Twitter poll MORE (Miss.) — Cochran said in a statement that he is "optimistic about the potential for this legislation to increase economic opportunity and help Mississippi families keep more of their take-home pay.”

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) — Collins said Friday she would vote for the bill after securing changes to the state and local property tax deduction, a measure to help those with high health-care costs and efforts to shore up ObamaCare markets.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynKavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow Grassley: Kavanaugh accuser 'deserves to be heard' in 'appropriate' manner MORE (Texas) — The No. 2 Republican in the chamber said in a floor speech that the Senate framework “is designed to cut taxes for middle-class families, not millionaires. It's to help small businesses grow and create more jobs. It's to provide relief for hardworking families by increasing the standard deduction.” Cornyn voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoHillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law Trump authorizes sanctions against foreign governments that interfere in US elections Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke MORE (Idaho) — Crapo voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGrassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt FEC: Cruz campaign didn't violate rules with fundraising letter labeled ‘summons’ Cruz criticizes O'Rourke on Dallas shooting: Wish he wasn't 'so quick to always blame the police officer' MORE (Texas) — Cruz defended the bill during a CNN town hall Tuesday night. "If you're a taxpayer, this bill benefits you," he said.

Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.) — Daines initally came out against the tax bill over concerns it unfairly favored corporations. But on Friday, Daines said he was a "yes" after winning more favorable treatment for pass-through businesses.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziCruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke Budget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Forcing faith-based agencies out of the system is a disservice to women MORE (Wyo.) — Enzi said in a statement that the legislation “will help grow the economy, create more jobs and raise wages. I look forward to working with my colleagues to help pass tax relief to not only benefit hardworking Americans, but make our economy and country stronger.”  He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and as chairman of the Budget Committee.

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstGOP senator divorcing from husband GOP senators introduce bill to preserve ObamaCare's pre-existing conditions protections Pence: Trump’s national security will be as 'dominant' in space as it is on Earth MORE (Iowa) — "It is long overdue for our country to pursue a simpler tax code that provides much-needed relief for hardworking Iowans that puts our economy back on track," Ernst wrote in an op-ed for the Des Moines Register.

Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.)  Flake released a statement just after noon Friday saying he had "secured" his "objectives" from negotiations and would be voting in favor of the legislation.

Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Colorado governor sets up federal PAC before potential 2020 campaign Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (Colo.) — Gardner voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCriticizing Trump’s ‘unsung success’ in Puerto Rico is valid — empty rhetoric is not Biden: Delay Kavanaugh vote to give accuser a fair, respectful hearing Ken Starr says 'I trust Brett Kavanaugh' over allegations that are 'so wildly out of character' MORE (S.C.) — Graham voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyWife of 'Glow' director writes 'Stop Kavanaugh' on her arm for Emmy Awards Grassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify MORE (Iowa) — Grassley said in a statement that the bill “takes a giant step forward to make our tax code simpler, fairer and more competitive.” He voted for the bill on the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDem rep who met with Kavanaugh accuser: 'She wanted her truth to come out' Senate passes bipartisan bill to curb opioid crisis Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday MORE (Utah) — Hatch is the Finance Committee Chairman and one of the architects of the bill.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerPoll: Dean Heller running even against Democratic challenger Dems gain momentum 50 days before midterms California was once the epicenter of pollution — time to learn from its green transition MORE (Nev.) — Heller voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. He is considered the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection in 2018.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOvernight Energy: Trump Cabinet officials head west | Zinke says California fires are not 'a debate about climate change' | Perry tours North Dakota coal mine | EPA chief meets industry leaders in Iowa to discuss ethanol mandate 74 protesters charged at Capitol in protest of Kavanaugh Big Oil’s carbon capture tax credit betrayal MORE (N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that “the Senate tax relief draft lowers rates for individuals and small businesses, including our farmers and ranchers, which is good for North Dakota and good for our nation.”

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeTrump privately calls Mattis ‘Moderate Dog’: report Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Steady Kavanaugh proves to be a tough target for Democrats MORE (Okla.) — Inhofe told The Oklahoman that he supports the Senate tax bill even if it increased the debt. 

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonTrump blasts Tester at Montana rally: 'He loves the swamp' Renaming Senate office building after McCain sparks GOP backlash GOP senator warns Trump: Anyone who trash-talks McCain 'deserves a whipping' MORE (Ga.) — Isakson said the tax package “will simplify our broken tax code and show the world that the United States will again be a world-class competitor in the global marketplace.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Ron Johnson (Wis.) — Johnson initially opposed the bill but is a "yes" after winning changes on how the bill treats small businesses and pass-through entities.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.) — Kennedy voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAnother recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us To cure Congress, elect more former military members MORE (Ariz.) — “After careful thought and consideration, I have decided to support the Senate tax reform bill," McCain said in a statement Thursday. "I believe this legislation, though far from perfect, would enhance American competitiveness, boost the economy, and provide long overdue tax relief for middle class families." McCain said he understood concerns about the deficit but the "bill's net effect on our economy would be positive."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify McConnell rips Democrats for handling of Kavanaugh nomination Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Ky.)

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMurkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Kavanaugh, accuser to testify publicly on Monday Kavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow MORE (Alaska) — Murkowski is a "yes," according to MSNBC. The tax bill will also be tied to a measure that would allow drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a longtime priority for Murkowski.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says Dems inflated Puerto Rico death toll | House cancels Friday votes | Florence starts to hit coast The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Facing major hurricane, Trump is tested MORE (Ky.) — Paul said he would have preferred a larger cut but hailed the bill for including repeal of the ObamaCare mandate. "I’ve fought for and received major changes for the better — and I plan to vote for this bill as it stands right now," he said Monday in an op-ed for Fox News. "I urge my colleagues to do the same."

Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) — Perdue said in a statement that “we are on track to deliver results and fundamentally change this tax code.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate passes bipartisan bill to curb opioid crisis Overnight Health Care: Opioid legislation passes overwhelmingly | DOJ backs Cigna-Express Scripts merger | Senate passes ban on pharmacy gag clauses This week: Allegations inject uncertainty into Kavanaugh nomination MORE (Ohio) — Portman voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischMcCain’s death marks decline of Trump’s GOP Senate critics Overnight Health Care: Senate approves massive bill including health spending | Bill includes drug pricing measure | Move to block Planned Parenthood funding fails Overnight Defense: Senate passes massive defense, domestic spending bill | Duncan Hunter to step down from committees | Pompeo names North Korea envoy MORE (Idaho) — Risch said on the Senate floor that "under the plan released by the Senate Finance Committee, middle-class Americans will see a benefit in the form of a lower tax bill, which means more money for households to bring home."

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsPat Robertson asks followers to help cast 'shield of protection' ahead of hurricane Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke The farm bill gives Congress a chance to act on the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act MORE (Kan.) — Roberts voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsOn The Money: Treasury rules target blue-state workarounds to tax law | Senate approves sweeping defense, domestic spending bill | US imposes B in tariffs on Chinese goods | Panel narrowly approves consumer bureau pick Senate panel narrowly approves Trump consumer bureau pick GOP sen: Sessions is ‘the right man for the job’ MORE (S.D.) — Rounds said on Twitter that the Senate tax bill would "create jobs, raise wages and provide a fairer tax system for South Dakotans."

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottCruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Steady Kavanaugh proves to be a tough target for Democrats Pence visits Michigan to boost GOP Senate candidate MORE (S.C.) — Scott voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyCongress reaches deal to fund government through Dec. 7, preventing shutdown Senate approves first 2019 spending package GOP shrugs off Trump shutdown threat MORE (Ala.) — Shelby said in a tweet that the Senate GOP tax plan will "grow the economy by 3.7 percent and create nearly 1 million new jobs across the nation."

Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeAnn Coulter believes Kushner wrote anonymous op-ed bashing Trump Mulvaney: Trump regularly asks why Roy Moore lost The Hill's Morning Report — General election season underway with marquee Senate races set MORE (Ala.) — Strange voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanCruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke Spotlight shifts to Kavanaugh ahead of hearings GOP senator: Trump firing Sessions wouldn't be 'politically wise' MORE (Alaska) — Sullivan is a "yes" vote.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph Thune Google, Apple, Amazon execs to testify at Senate privacy hearing this month Trump gets good news on wages Flake rebuts Trump: Anonymous op-ed author did not commit 'treason' MORE (S.D.) — Thune said on Twitter that “the American people deserve a tax code that works for them, not against them. That grows their paychecks, instead of shrinking them. ... And that’s exactly what we’re going to give them, starting today.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisNorth Carolina governor: We saw ‘significant damage’ in eastern part of state GOP senator on allegation against Kavanaugh: 'Why on Earth' wasn't it discussed earlier? North Carolina senator: Damage from Florence 'in the billions of dollars' MORE (N.C.) — Tillis is a "yes" on the tax bill.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (Pa.) — Toomey said in a statement that “this tax reform package is going to directly lower the tax bill, and therefore, be a pay raise for the overwhelming, vast majority of Pennsylvanians who are getting up every day and going to work and supporting their families. And that’s very good news.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerTrump cancels Mississippi rally due to hurricane Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke GOP senators introduce bill to preserve ObamaCare's pre-existing conditions protections MORE (Miss.) — “I am eager to roll up my sleeves — working nights if necessary, working weekends if necessary — to get this bill to the president’s desk,” Wicker said in a statement.