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The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill

Senate Republicans are poised to pass a massive tax-reform plan.

Leaders had hoped to pass the bill this week but momentum stalled Thursday night with a handful of GOP senators pushing for changes to address the bill's impact on the deficit and its treatment of so-called pass through businesses.

But changes to the bill won support from Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements Trump endorses Rand Paul for reelection MORE (R-Wis.) and Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesTrump faces test of power with early endorsements OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court declines to hear challenge to Obama marine monument designation | Interior reverses course on tribal ownership of portion of Missouri river | White House climate adviser meets with oil and gas companies Senate GOP pushes back on list of participants in oil and gas leasing forum MORE (R-Mont.) who wanted better treatment for businesses that are not corporations.

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Another proposal being considered would reduce the size of the $1.4 trillion tax package by $350 billion to win over Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 It's time for Biden's Cuba MORE (R-Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFive reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain Former GOP lawmaker: Republican Party 'engulfed in lies and fear' MORE (R-Ariz.), who have concerns about the deficit. But that change is not popular with House conservatives.

Early Friday afternoon, Flake said he was "pleased to announce" he could support the legislation in its current form, appearing to give Republicans their necessary 50 votes.

Corker is the lone Republican to oppose the bill.

Once it clears the Senate, lawmakers would then have to reconcile it with the House tax-reform package, which has key differences, and pass it through both chambers before delivery to the White House by year's end.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

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This list was last updated on Dec. 1 at 5:01 p.m. Latest updates: Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start Moderate GOP senators and Biden clash at start of infrastructure debate MORE (Maine) Jeff Flake (Ariz.), Ron Johnson (Wis.), and Steve Daines (Mont.).

 

No (1)

Sen. Bob Corker (Tenn.) — Corker wanted a "trigger" that would raise taxes if revenue projections fell short, but that proposal failed to meet Senate rules. Leaders floated but eventually rejected an offer to scale back the cuts by hundreds of billions of dollars. “This is yet another tough vote. I am disappointed. I wanted to get to 'yes.' But at the end of the day, I am not able to cast aside my fiscal concerns and vote for legislation that I believe, based on the information I currently have, could deepen the debt burden on future generations," Corker said in a statement Friday.

 

Likely yes (8)

Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonMcConnell, GOP slam Biden's executive order on SCOTUS Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists POW/MIA flag moved back atop White House MORE (Ark.) — Cotton is likely a "yes" vote. "Every income group under the Senate bill will see a tax cut," Cotton told CBS News's "Face the Nation."

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerBiden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure Daschle Group hires first GOP lobbyist Don't press pause on the PAWS Act MORE (Neb.) — Fischer is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordRubio and bipartisan group of senators push to make daylight saving time permanent Senate inches toward COVID-19 vote after marathon session Ron Johnson grinds Senate to halt, irritating many MORE (Okla.) — Lankford said Wednesday he would back the bill if it includes a "backstop" that would raise rates if revenue fails to meet expectations. “So yes, I am on board with this bill because I want to see the good economic growth that’s coming with it, but I also want to make sure we’re protecting future taxpayers as well in debt and deficit,” he told "CBS This Morning."

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn management of Utah public lands, Biden should pursue an accountable legislative process Rubio asks MLB commissioner if he'll give up Augusta golf club membership Why some Republicans think vaccine passports will backfire on Democrats MORE (Utah) — Lee is seeking an increase in the child tax credit and is introducing an amendment on that issue with Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Memo: Biden's five biggest foreign policy challenges Hillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists MORE (R-Fla.).

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranBipartisan lawmakers call for action on anti-hate crime measures Republicans don't think Biden really wants to work with them Trump allies line up ahead of potentially bruising primaries MORE (Kan.) — Moran told Fox News on Tuesday he "expects to vote 'yes.' " Moran previously raised concerns about the repeal of the individual mandate and the bill's impact on the deficit.

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) — Rubio is seeking an increase in the child tax credit with Sen. Mike Lee (Utah).

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Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Maine GOP rejects motion to censure Collins Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats MORE (Neb.) — Sasse is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Senate Republicans voice opposition to Biden on Iran Biden infrastructure proposal prioritizes funds for emerging technologies MORE (Ind.) — "I am highly probable to vote for this," Young told The Indianapolis Star on Wednesday. "Of course, it’s subject to an amendment process on the floor. I still need to take a look at what sort of amendments are offered. But I’m pleased with the work product."

 

Yes (43)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Blunt's retirement deals blow to McConnell inner circle MORE (Tenn.) — Alexander told USA Today he supports the tax plan and using it to repeal the individual mandate.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSunday shows preview: Democrats eye passage of infrastructure bill; health experts warn of fourth coronavirus wave Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows As Congress considers infrastructure, don't forget rural America MORE (Wyo.) — Barrasso told Fox News the Senate GOP tax bill would create a "simpler, fairer" tax system.

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Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThune: 'There are Republicans who would vote' for smaller infrastructure package Republicans can't handle the truth about taxes Sunday shows preview: Democrats eye two-part infrastructure push; Michigan coronavirus cases surge MORE (Mo.) — Blunt told NBC's "Meet the Press" that "we've had eight years of economic stagnation for hardworking families and this tax bill, I think, creates the opportunity to move dramatically beyond that."

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanArkansas governor quietly bucking GOP's dive into culture wars Trump allies line up ahead of potentially bruising primaries Fundraising spat points to Trump-GOP fissures MORE (Ark.) — Boozman voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrNorth Carolina mayor Rett Newton launches Senate bid Democratic hopeful Jeff Jackson raises .3M for North Carolina Senate bid Rick Scott 'very optimistic' Grassley will run for another term MORE (N.C.) — Burr voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoBiden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start Moderate GOP senators and Biden clash at start of infrastructure debate America's infrastructure: You get what you pay for MORE (W.Va.) — “For West Virginians and so many Americans across the country, the status quo just isn’t working, and this is our opportunity to change it,” Capito said in a statement.

Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyCalls grow for national paid family leave amid pandemic Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats Vivek Murthy confirmed as surgeon general MORE (La.) — Cassidy said in a floor speech that under the Senate tax bill his constituents “will increase their take-home pay, they'll have higher wages, they will have a better life.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. 

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.) — Cochran said in a statement that he is "optimistic about the potential for this legislation to increase economic opportunity and help Mississippi families keep more of their take-home pay.”

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Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) — Collins said Friday she would vote for the bill after securing changes to the state and local property tax deduction, a measure to help those with high health-care costs and efforts to shore up ObamaCare markets.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Dakota Access pipeline to remain in operation despite calls for shutdown | Biden hopes to boost climate spending by B | White House budget proposes .4B for environmental justice 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet Number of migrants detained at southern border reaches 15-year high: reports MORE (Texas) — The No. 2 Republican in the chamber said in a floor speech that the Senate framework “is designed to cut taxes for middle-class families, not millionaires. It's to help small businesses grow and create more jobs. It's to provide relief for hardworking families by increasing the standard deduction.” Cornyn voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoTrump faces test of power with early endorsements The Hill's Morning Report - Biden shifts on filibuster Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats MORE (Idaho) — Crapo voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBoehner: Trump 'stepped all over their loyalty' by lying to followers The Memo: Biden's five biggest foreign policy challenges Boehner finally calls it as he sees it MORE (Texas) — Cruz defended the bill during a CNN town hall Tuesday night. "If you're a taxpayer, this bill benefits you," he said.

Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.) — Daines initally came out against the tax bill over concerns it unfairly favored corporations. But on Friday, Daines said he was a "yes" after winning more favorable treatment for pass-through businesses.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes MORE (Wyo.) — Enzi said in a statement that the legislation “will help grow the economy, create more jobs and raise wages. I look forward to working with my colleagues to help pass tax relief to not only benefit hardworking Americans, but make our economy and country stronger.”  He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and as chairman of the Budget Committee.

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstTrump faces test of power with early endorsements GOP looks to squeeze Biden, Democrats on border Blackburn introduces bill to require migrant DNA testing at border MORE (Iowa) — "It is long overdue for our country to pursue a simpler tax code that provides much-needed relief for hardworking Iowans that puts our economy back on track," Ernst wrote in an op-ed for the Des Moines Register.

Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.)  Flake released a statement just after noon Friday saying he had "secured" his "objectives" from negotiations and would be voting in favor of the legislation.

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.) — Gardner voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMSNBC's Joy Reid pans Manchin, Sinema as the 'no progress caucus' Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike MORE (S.C.) — Graham voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyNumber of migrants detained at southern border reaches 15-year high: reports Grassley, Cornyn push for Senate border hearing The Hill's Morning Report - GOP pounces on Biden's infrastructure plan MORE (Iowa) — Grassley said in a statement that the bill “takes a giant step forward to make our tax code simpler, fairer and more competitive.” He voted for the bill on the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchPress: Forget bipartisanship — it's dead! Privatization of foster care has been a disaster for children Remembering Ted Kennedy highlights decline of the Senate MORE (Utah) — Hatch is the Finance Committee Chairman and one of the architects of the bill.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.) — Heller voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. He is considered the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection in 2018.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court declines to hear challenge to Obama marine monument designation | Interior reverses course on tribal ownership of portion of Missouri river | White House climate adviser meets with oil and gas companies Senate GOP pushes back on list of participants in oil and gas leasing forum Small cities fret over feds redefining metro areas MORE (N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that “the Senate tax relief draft lowers rates for individuals and small businesses, including our farmers and ranchers, which is good for North Dakota and good for our nation.”

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeBiden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike Sanders expresses 'serious concerns' with Biden's defense increase Senate GOP slams Biden defense budget MORE (Okla.) — Inhofe told The Oklahoman that he supports the Senate tax bill even if it increased the debt. 

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonFive big takeaways on Georgia's new election law Warnock: 'Almost impossible to overstate' importance of voting rights legislation Top Georgia Republican says he won't run for Senate MORE (Ga.) — Isakson said the tax package “will simplify our broken tax code and show the world that the United States will again be a world-class competitor in the global marketplace.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Ron Johnson (Wis.) — Johnson initially opposed the bill but is a "yes" after winning changes on how the bill treats small businesses and pass-through entities.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.) — Kennedy voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainColbert mocks Gaetz after Trump denies he asked for a pardon Five reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Meghan McCain calls on Gaetz to resign MORE (Ariz.) — “After careful thought and consideration, I have decided to support the Senate tax reform bill," McCain said in a statement Thursday. "I believe this legislation, though far from perfect, would enhance American competitiveness, boost the economy, and provide long overdue tax relief for middle class families." McCain said he understood concerns about the deficit but the "bill's net effect on our economy would be positive."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure 100 business executives discuss how to combat new voting rules: report Arkansas governor says 'divisive' Trump attacks on GOP officials are 'unhelpful' MORE (Ky.)

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump looms large over GOP donor retreat in Florida Top GOP super PAC endorses Murkowski amid primary threat Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start MORE (Alaska) — Murkowski is a "yes," according to MSNBC. The tax bill will also be tied to a measure that would allow drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a longtime priority for Murkowski.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulAlarm grows over impact of states banning trans youth treatment The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - World mourns the death of Prince Philip The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (Ky.) — Paul said he would have preferred a larger cut but hailed the bill for including repeal of the ObamaCare mandate. "I’ve fought for and received major changes for the better — and I plan to vote for this bill as it stands right now," he said Monday in an op-ed for Fox News. "I urge my colleagues to do the same."

Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) — Perdue said in a statement that “we are on track to deliver results and fundamentally change this tax code.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP Ohio Senate candidate asked to leave RNC retreat To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (Ohio) — Portman voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Jim RischJim Elroy RischGOP lawmakers block Biden assistance to Palestinians Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows The Hill's Morning Report - Biden shifts on filibuster MORE (Idaho) — Risch said on the Senate floor that "under the plan released by the Senate Finance Committee, middle-class Americans will see a benefit in the form of a lower tax bill, which means more money for households to bring home."

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 Lobbying world MORE (Kan.) — Roberts voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike RoundsMike RoundsCongress looks to rein in Biden's war powers Columbine and the era of the mass shooter, two decades on GOP senator tweets statue of himself holding gun to Biden: 'Come and take it' MORE (S.D.) — Rounds said on Twitter that the Senate tax bill would "create jobs, raise wages and provide a fairer tax system for South Dakotans."

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottPassage of FASTER Act is critical for food allergy community 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet Democrats justified in filibustering GOP, says Schumer MORE (S.C.) — Scott voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyFive takeaways from Biden's first budget proposal Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists Biden defense budget criticized by Republicans, progressives alike MORE (Ala.) — Shelby said in a tweet that the Senate GOP tax plan will "grow the economy by 3.7 percent and create nearly 1 million new jobs across the nation."

Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Ala.) — Strange voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanCongress must address the toxic exposure our veterans have endured GOP lawmakers ask Biden administration for guidance on reopening cruise industry Alaska's other GOP senator says he'll back Murkowski for reelection MORE (Alaska) — Sullivan is a "yes" vote.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSunday shows - Infrastructure dominates GOP senator dismisses Trump-McConnell feud Thune: 'There are Republicans who would vote' for smaller infrastructure package MORE (S.D.) — Thune said on Twitter that “the American people deserve a tax code that works for them, not against them. That grows their paychecks, instead of shrinking them. ... And that’s exactly what we’re going to give them, starting today.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings GOP senator recovering from surgery for prostate cancer Congress must address the toxic exposure our veterans have endured MORE (N.C.) — Tillis is a "yes" on the tax bill.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeySasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Philly GOP commissioner on censures: 'I would suggest they censure Republican elected officials who are lying' Toomey censured by several Pennsylvania county GOP committees over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) — Toomey said in a statement that “this tax reform package is going to directly lower the tax bill, and therefore, be a pay raise for the overwhelming, vast majority of Pennsylvanians who are getting up every day and going to work and supporting their families. And that’s very good news.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBiden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure Sunday shows - Infrastructure dominates Senate Republican targets infrastructure package's effect on small business job creators MORE (Miss.) — “I am eager to roll up my sleeves — working nights if necessary, working weekends if necessary — to get this bill to the president’s desk,” Wicker said in a statement.