The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill

Senate Republicans are poised to pass a massive tax-reform plan.

Leaders had hoped to pass the bill this week but momentum stalled Thursday night with a handful of GOP senators pushing for changes to address the bill's impact on the deficit and its treatment of so-called pass through businesses.

But changes to the bill won support from Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGrassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa Sunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines MORE (R-Wis.) and Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesSenate committee advances bipartisan energy infrastructure bill  Hillicon Valley: Lina Khan faces major FTC test | Amazon calls for her recusal | Warren taps commodities watchdog to probe Google Senators propose bill to help private sector defend against hackers MORE (R-Mont.) who wanted better treatment for businesses that are not corporations.

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Another proposal being considered would reduce the size of the $1.4 trillion tax package by $350 billion to win over Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (R-Ariz.), who have concerns about the deficit. But that change is not popular with House conservatives.

Early Friday afternoon, Flake said he was "pleased to announce" he could support the legislation in its current form, appearing to give Republicans their necessary 50 votes.

Corker is the lone Republican to oppose the bill.

Once it clears the Senate, lawmakers would then have to reconcile it with the House tax-reform package, which has key differences, and pass it through both chambers before delivery to the White House by year's end.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

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This list was last updated on Dec. 1 at 5:01 p.m. Latest updates: Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSchumer urges GOP to ignore Trump: He's 'rooting for failure' Trump pressures McConnell, GOP to ditch bipartisan talks until they have majority Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal MORE (Maine) Jeff Flake (Ariz.), Ron Johnson (Wis.), and Steve Daines (Mont.).

 

No (1)

Sen. Bob Corker (Tenn.) — Corker wanted a "trigger" that would raise taxes if revenue projections fell short, but that proposal failed to meet Senate rules. Leaders floated but eventually rejected an offer to scale back the cuts by hundreds of billions of dollars. “This is yet another tough vote. I am disappointed. I wanted to get to 'yes.' But at the end of the day, I am not able to cast aside my fiscal concerns and vote for legislation that I believe, based on the information I currently have, could deepen the debt burden on future generations," Corker said in a statement Friday.

 

Likely yes (8)

Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonEx-Rep. Abby Finkenauer running for Senate in Iowa Poll: Trump leads 2024 GOP primary trailed by Pence, DeSantis Republicans raise concerns about Olympians using digital yuan during Beijing Games MORE (Ark.) — Cotton is likely a "yes" vote. "Every income group under the Senate bill will see a tax cut," Cotton told CBS News's "Face the Nation."

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerLawmakers introduce bill allowing higher ethanol blend in gasoline after ruling Lobbying world On The Money: May jobs report to land at pivotal moment in Biden agenda | Biden, top GOP negotiator agree to continue infrastructure talks Friday MORE (Neb.) — Fischer is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordAbbott slams Ben & Jerry's for Palestine support: 'Disgraceful' Democrat stalls Biden's border nominee Republican calls on Oklahoma to ban Ben & Jerry's MORE (Okla.) — Lankford said Wednesday he would back the bill if it includes a "backstop" that would raise rates if revenue fails to meet expectations. “So yes, I am on board with this bill because I want to see the good economic growth that’s coming with it, but I also want to make sure we’re protecting future taxpayers as well in debt and deficit,” he told "CBS This Morning."

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Biden's Air Force secretary Trio of Senate Republicans urges Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks MORE (Utah) — Lee is seeking an increase in the child tax credit and is introducing an amendment on that issue with Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP lawmakers request Cuba meeting with Biden Bipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks MORE (R-Fla.).

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGraham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient This week: Democrats move forward with Jan. 6 probe Bipartisan senators ask CDC, TSA when they will update mask guidance for travelers MORE (Kan.) — Moran told Fox News on Tuesday he "expects to vote 'yes.' " Moran previously raised concerns about the repeal of the individual mandate and the bill's impact on the deficit.

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) — Rubio is seeking an increase in the child tax credit with Sen. Mike Lee (Utah).

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Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseSasse calls China's Xi a 'coward' after Apple Daily arrest Defunct newspaper's senior editor arrested in Hong Kong Murkowski: Trump has 'threatened to do a lot' to those who stand up to him MORE (Neb.) — Sasse is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Paying attention to critical infrastructure can combat sophisticated cyberattacks Schumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up MORE (Ind.) — "I am highly probable to vote for this," Young told The Indianapolis Star on Wednesday. "Of course, it’s subject to an amendment process on the floor. I still need to take a look at what sort of amendments are offered. But I’m pleased with the work product."

 

Yes (43)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderAuthorities link ex-Tennessee governor to killing of Jimmy Hoffa associate The Republicans' deep dive into nativism Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (Tenn.) — Alexander told USA Today he supports the tax plan and using it to repeal the individual mandate.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoOvernight Energy: Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee | Nevada Democrat introduces bill requiring feds to develop fire management plan | NJ requiring public water systems to replace lead pipes in 10 years Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee in tie vote Democrats seek to counter GOP attacks on gas prices MORE (Wyo.) — Barrasso told Fox News the Senate GOP tax bill would create a "simpler, fairer" tax system.

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Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Morning Report - Will Schumer back down on his deadline? GOP fumes over Schumer hardball strategy Cybersecurity bills gain new urgency after rash of attacks MORE (Mo.) — Blunt told NBC's "Meet the Press" that "we've had eight years of economic stagnation for hardworking families and this tax bill, I think, creates the opportunity to move dramatically beyond that."

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanTrump getting tougher for Senate GOP to ignore Former NFL player challenging Boozman in Arkansas GOP primary Senate GOP opens door to earmarks MORE (Ark.) — Boozman voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Bipartisan group to issue 'promising' statement on infrastructure path forward First responders shouldn't have to tackle tigers MORE (N.C.) — Burr voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOfficials warn of cybersecurity vulnerabilities in water systems Graham, Hawley call on Judiciary Committee to hold hearing on US-Mexico border GOP senators urge Biden to keep Trump-era border restrictions MORE (W.Va.) — “For West Virginians and so many Americans across the country, the status quo just isn’t working, and this is our opportunity to change it,” Capito said in a statement.

Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor The Hill's Morning Report - High-profile COVID-19 infections spark new worries GOP centrists call on Schumer to delay infrastructure vote MORE (La.) — Cassidy said in a floor speech that under the Senate tax bill his constituents “will increase their take-home pay, they'll have higher wages, they will have a better life.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. 

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Miss.) — Cochran said in a statement that he is "optimistic about the potential for this legislation to increase economic opportunity and help Mississippi families keep more of their take-home pay.”

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Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) — Collins said Friday she would vote for the bill after securing changes to the state and local property tax deduction, a measure to help those with high health-care costs and efforts to shore up ObamaCare markets.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynDACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats Schumer feels pressure from all sides on spending strategy Data reveal big opportunity to finish the vaccine job MORE (Texas) — The No. 2 Republican in the chamber said in a floor speech that the Senate framework “is designed to cut taxes for middle-class families, not millionaires. It's to help small businesses grow and create more jobs. It's to provide relief for hardworking families by increasing the standard deduction.” Cornyn voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoHow Sen. Graham can help fix the labor shortage with commonsense immigration reform Lobbying world On The Money: Biden fires head of Social Security Administration | IRS scandals haunt Biden push for more funding MORE (Idaho) — Crapo voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrio of Senate Republicans urges Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia next week MORE (Texas) — Cruz defended the bill during a CNN town hall Tuesday night. "If you're a taxpayer, this bill benefits you," he said.

Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.) — Daines initally came out against the tax bill over concerns it unfairly favored corporations. But on Friday, Daines said he was a "yes" after winning more favorable treatment for pass-through businesses.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziFormer Sen. Mike Enzi hospitalized after serious bicycle accident The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality MORE (Wyo.) — Enzi said in a statement that the legislation “will help grow the economy, create more jobs and raise wages. I look forward to working with my colleagues to help pass tax relief to not only benefit hardworking Americans, but make our economy and country stronger.”  He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and as chairman of the Budget Committee.

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstGrassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa Republicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund MORE (Iowa) — "It is long overdue for our country to pursue a simpler tax code that provides much-needed relief for hardworking Iowans that puts our economy back on track," Ernst wrote in an op-ed for the Des Moines Register.

Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.)  Flake released a statement just after noon Friday saying he had "secured" his "objectives" from negotiations and would be voting in favor of the legislation.

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Biden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms MORE (Colo.) — Gardner voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP sees debt ceiling as its leverage against Biden DACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats Senate braces for a nasty debt ceiling fight MORE (S.C.) — Graham voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Jan. 6 probe, infrastructure to dominate week Grassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel MORE (Iowa) — Grassley said in a statement that the bill “takes a giant step forward to make our tax code simpler, fairer and more competitive.” He voted for the bill on the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDrug prices are declining amid inflation fears The national action imperative to achieve 30 by 30 Financial market transactions should not be taxed or restricted MORE (Utah) — Hatch is the Finance Committee Chairman and one of the architects of the bill.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerDemocrat Jacky Rosen becomes 22nd senator to back bipartisan infrastructure deal 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 On The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare MORE (Nev.) — Heller voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. He is considered the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection in 2018.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP senators urge Biden to keep Trump-era border restrictions A plan to address the growing orphaned wells crisis Lobbying world MORE (N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that “the Senate tax relief draft lowers rates for individuals and small businesses, including our farmers and ranchers, which is good for North Dakota and good for our nation.”

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeGillibrand expects vote on military justice bill in fall The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Biden backs Cuban protesters, assails 'authoritarian regime' Trump getting tougher for Senate GOP to ignore MORE (Okla.) — Inhofe told The Oklahoman that he supports the Senate tax bill even if it increased the debt. 

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonCritical race theory becomes focus of midterms Former Georgia ethics official to challenge McBath Loeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run MORE (Ga.) — Isakson said the tax package “will simplify our broken tax code and show the world that the United States will again be a world-class competitor in the global marketplace.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Ron Johnson (Wis.) — Johnson initially opposed the bill but is a "yes" after winning changes on how the bill treats small businesses and pass-through entities.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.) — Kennedy voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' Democrats seek to counter GOP attacks on gas prices Biden nominates Jeff Flake as ambassador to Turkey MORE (Ariz.) — “After careful thought and consideration, I have decided to support the Senate tax reform bill," McCain said in a statement Thursday. "I believe this legislation, though far from perfect, would enhance American competitiveness, boost the economy, and provide long overdue tax relief for middle class families." McCain said he understood concerns about the deficit but the "bill's net effect on our economy would be positive."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios House rejects GOP effort to seat McCarthy's picks for Jan. 6 panel Senators scramble to save infrastructure deal MORE (Ky.)

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhy Biden's Interior Department isn't shutting down oil and gas Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (Alaska) — Murkowski is a "yes," according to MSNBC. The tax bill will also be tied to a measure that would allow drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a longtime priority for Murkowski.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Rep. Cawthorn says he wants to 'prosecute' Fauci Writer: Fauci, Paul clash shouldn't distract from probe into COVID-19 origins S.E. Cupp: 'The politicization of science and health safety has inarguably cost lives' MORE (Ky.) — Paul said he would have preferred a larger cut but hailed the bill for including repeal of the ObamaCare mandate. "I’ve fought for and received major changes for the better — and I plan to vote for this bill as it stands right now," he said Monday in an op-ed for Fox News. "I urge my colleagues to do the same."

Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) — Perdue said in a statement that “we are on track to deliver results and fundamentally change this tax code.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators scramble to save infrastructure deal On The Money: Senate infrastructure talks on shaky grounds | Trump tells Republicans to walk away | GOP sees debt ceiling as its leverage against Biden Schumer urges GOP to ignore Trump: He's 'rooting for failure' MORE (Ohio) — Portman voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Jim RischJim Elroy RischSenate panel advances controversial public lands nominee in tie vote GOP senators invite Yellen to brief them on debt ceiling expiration, inflation Top Democrat leads bipartisan trip to Middle East MORE (Idaho) — Risch said on the Senate floor that "under the plan released by the Senate Finance Committee, middle-class Americans will see a benefit in the form of a lower tax bill, which means more money for households to bring home."

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsBob Dole, Pat Roberts endorse Kansas AG Derek Schmidt for governor Ex-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (Kan.) — Roberts voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike RoundsMike RoundsBipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Schumer sets up key vote on bipartisan deal Graham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient MORE (S.D.) — Rounds said on Twitter that the Senate tax bill would "create jobs, raise wages and provide a fairer tax system for South Dakotans."

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottScott: 'There is hope' for police reform bill Sunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Noem to travel to South Carolina for early voting event MORE (S.C.) — Scott voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyNational Guard cancels trainings after Congress fails to reimburse for Capitol riot deployment This week: Senate faces infrastructure squeeze GOP seeks to make Biden synonymous with inflation MORE (Ala.) — Shelby said in a tweet that the Senate GOP tax plan will "grow the economy by 3.7 percent and create nearly 1 million new jobs across the nation."

Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangePandemic proves importance of pharmaceutical innovation The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Trump faces test of power with early endorsements MORE (Ala.) — Strange voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanSenate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Concerns grow over China's Taiwan plans China conducts amphibious landing drill near Taiwan after senators' visit MORE (Alaska) — Sullivan is a "yes" vote.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenators scramble to save infrastructure deal GOP sees debt ceiling as its leverage against Biden Frustration builds as infrastructure talks drag MORE (S.D.) — Thune said on Twitter that “the American people deserve a tax code that works for them, not against them. That grows their paychecks, instead of shrinking them. ... And that’s exactly what we’re going to give them, starting today.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisDACA court ruling puts weight of immigration reform on Democrats Senators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (N.C.) — Tillis is a "yes" on the tax bill.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) — Toomey said in a statement that “this tax reform package is going to directly lower the tax bill, and therefore, be a pay raise for the overwhelming, vast majority of Pennsylvanians who are getting up every day and going to work and supporting their families. And that’s very good news.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHere's evidence the Senate confirmation process is broken Commerce office used racial profiling operating as 'rogue' police force: Senate report Rand Paul introducing measure to repeal public transportation mask mandates MORE (Miss.) — “I am eager to roll up my sleeves — working nights if necessary, working weekends if necessary — to get this bill to the president’s desk,” Wicker said in a statement.