25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick

25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick
© Camille Fine

Over two dozen Democratic lawmakers on Monday filed a brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in support of Leandra English's authority to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over President Trump's appointment, Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyProtect the Military Lending Act On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Warren suggests Mulvaney broke law by speaking to GOP donors MORE.

Twenty-five current Senate and House lawmakers filed a friend of the court brief arguing that English, who was elevated by the CFPB's director on his last day, should serve as acting director of the consumer bureau until a permanent director, nominated by the president, is confirmed by the Senate. 

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Trump, in a move apparently meant to supersede English's appointment, named Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, as acting director hours after English was promoted.

“President Trump is entitled to choose who the next Director of the Bureau will be, but he must nominate that person, and the Senate must agree to confirm him or her,” the lawmakers wrote. “Until that happens, Dodd-Frank makes clear who should be running the Bureau: its Deputy Director.”

They also criticized Trump's appointment of Mulvaney as "a designee who reflects the President’s policy preferences but has not been subject to the check of Senate confirmation."

Among some of the Democratic lawmakers to sign the court brief include Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle READ: President Trump’s exclusive interview with Hill.TV The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump slams Sessions in exclusive Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh accuser wants FBI investigation MORE (N.Y.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenMore Massachusetts Voters Prefer Deval Patrick for President than Elizabeth Warren Trump's trade war — firing all cannons or closing the portholes? Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 MORE (Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownElection Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (Ohio), House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiTrump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada Lawmakers consider easing costs on drug companies as part of opioids deal New grounds for impeachment? House Dem says Trump deserves it for making society worse MORE (Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDems' confidence swells with midterms fast approaching Trump's Puerto Rico tweets spark backlash Hoyer lays out government reform blueprint MORE (Md.), Rep. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonEllison accuser: Dems 'smeared, threatened, isolated' me Kavanaugh becomes September surprise for midterm candidates Trump Jr., Dem congressman spar over Ellison's association with Farrakhan MORE (Minn).

A dramatic showdown began on Friday after the White House and the CFPB butted heads over who will lead the Wall Street watchdog agency following Richard Cordray's resignation.

Before stepping down, Cordray named his chief of staff, English, to the deputy director position. The 2010 Dodd-Frank Act says the deputy director will lead the agency if there is not a permanent director.

Both officials claimed they are the rightful acting director of the CFPB on Monday, entangling current employees in an escalating legal dispute.