25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick

25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick
© Camille Fine

Over two dozen Democratic lawmakers on Monday filed a brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in support of Leandra English's authority to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over President Trump's appointment, Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - Trump attack on progressive Dems draws sharp rebuke Acosta out as Trump Labor secretary Pelosi reportedly told Trump deputy: 'What was your name, dear?' MORE.

Twenty-five current Senate and House lawmakers filed a friend of the court brief arguing that English, who was elevated by the CFPB's director on his last day, should serve as acting director of the consumer bureau until a permanent director, nominated by the president, is confirmed by the Senate. 

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Trump, in a move apparently meant to supersede English's appointment, named Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, as acting director hours after English was promoted.

“President Trump is entitled to choose who the next Director of the Bureau will be, but he must nominate that person, and the Senate must agree to confirm him or her,” the lawmakers wrote. “Until that happens, Dodd-Frank makes clear who should be running the Bureau: its Deputy Director.”

They also criticized Trump's appointment of Mulvaney as "a designee who reflects the President’s policy preferences but has not been subject to the check of Senate confirmation."

Among some of the Democratic lawmakers to sign the court brief include Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Charities say they never received donations touted by Jeffrey Epstein: report Schumer to donate Epstein campaign contributions to groups fighting sexual violence MORE (N.Y.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' Trump says administration will 'take a look' after Thiel raises concerns about Google, China Thiel calls Warren the most 'dangerous' Democratic candidate MORE (Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDemocrat Sherrod Brown torches Facebook at hearing: 'They broke journalism, helped incite a genocide' Trump puts hopes for Fed revolution on unconventional candidate Budowsky: Harris attacked Biden, helped Trump MORE (Ohio), House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Democrat pushes for censuring Trump in closed-door meeting Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body Ocasio-Cortez responds to fresh criticism from Trump MORE (Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerOcasio-Cortez responds to fresh criticism from Trump House Democrats introduce resolution condemning Trump for 'racist' comments Feehery: Trump inspires temporary House Democratic unity MORE (Md.), Rep. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonFormer Sanders aides launch consulting firm Minnesota AG will defend state's abortion restrictions despite personal views Hillicon Valley: House panel advances election security bill | GOP senator targets YouTube with bill on child exploitation | Hicks told Congress Trump camp felt 'relief' after release of Clinton docs | Commerce blacklists five Chinese tech groups MORE (Minn).

A dramatic showdown began on Friday after the White House and the CFPB butted heads over who will lead the Wall Street watchdog agency following Richard Cordray's resignation.

Before stepping down, Cordray named his chief of staff, English, to the deputy director position. The 2010 Dodd-Frank Act says the deputy director will lead the agency if there is not a permanent director.

Both officials claimed they are the rightful acting director of the CFPB on Monday, entangling current employees in an escalating legal dispute.