Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors

Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersHillicon Valley: New York says goodbye to Amazon's HQ2 | AOC reacts: 'Anything is possible' | FTC pushes for record Facebook fine | Cyber threats to utilities on the rise O’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation Amazon to pay Bernie Sanders in federal income taxes: report MORE (I-Vt.) on Wednesday congratulated Republicans for being honest that the GOP tax bill was written for wealthy campaign contributors.

"This tax bill was written for Republicans’ wealthy campaign contributors. I want to congratulate my Republican colleagues for their honesty about that," Sanders tweeted Wednesday.

"There has not been one public hearing, no opportunity to hear from economists, governors, mayors or ordinary Americans who will be impacted by this tax bill. This is a sham," he said in a subsequent tweet.

In a video posted on Twitter, Sanders said that some Republicans have said publicly that if they don't pass this tax bill, their "wealthy friends will stop contributing."

"I appreciate that honesty," he said.

Last month, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham seeks new Rosenstein testimony after explosive McCabe interview Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general Graham demands testimony from former FBI acting Director McCabe MORE (R-S.C.) said "financial contributions will stop" for the GOP if the party doesn't pass tax reform.

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"The party fractures, most incumbents in 2018 will get a severe primary challenge, a lot of them will probably lose, the base will fracture, the financial contributions will stop, other than that it'll be fine," he said.

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsHouse Dems unveil initial GOP targets in 2020 The Memo: Pelosi ups ante in Trump showdown Pelosi tells Trump no State of the Union on Tuesday MORE (R-N.Y.) also acknowledged last month that he is facing pressure from donors to ensure the GOP tax-reform proposal gets done.

Collins last month had been describing the flurry of lobbying from special interests seeking to protect favored tax provisions when a reporter asked if donors are happy with the tax-reform proposal.

“My donors are basically saying, ‘Get it done or don’t ever call me again,’” Collins replied.

On Wednesday, Senate and House Republicans struck an "agreement in principle" on a sweeping tax-cut bill.

GOP sources familiar with the conference committee talks said negotiators are now just cleaning up some of the details on paying for last-minute changes to the bill, which would lower the top individual tax rate to 37 percent and set the corporate tax rate at 21 percent, according to a person briefed on the package.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' ACLU says planned national emergency declaration is 'clear abuse of presidential power' O'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could MORE and congressional Republicans have pitched their tax-reform effort as delivering much-needed tax cuts to the middle class and U.S. businesses that would boost U.S. economic growth.

Democrats, however, have argued that the tax overhaul would amount to a massive windfall for the wealthiest Americans.