Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors

Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFive takeaways from Trump's 2020 kickoff rally Five takeaways from Trump's 2020 kickoff rally Sanders tears into Trump in response to campaign kickoff rally MORE (I-Vt.) on Wednesday congratulated Republicans for being honest that the GOP tax bill was written for wealthy campaign contributors.

"This tax bill was written for Republicans’ wealthy campaign contributors. I want to congratulate my Republican colleagues for their honesty about that," Sanders tweeted Wednesday.

"There has not been one public hearing, no opportunity to hear from economists, governors, mayors or ordinary Americans who will be impacted by this tax bill. This is a sham," he said in a subsequent tweet.

In a video posted on Twitter, Sanders said that some Republicans have said publicly that if they don't pass this tax bill, their "wealthy friends will stop contributing."

"I appreciate that honesty," he said.

Last month, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Shanahan drama shocks Capitol Hill, leaving Pentagon rudderless Shanahan drama shocks Capitol Hill, leaving Pentagon rudderless MORE (R-S.C.) said "financial contributions will stop" for the GOP if the party doesn't pass tax reform.

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"The party fractures, most incumbents in 2018 will get a severe primary challenge, a lot of them will probably lose, the base will fracture, the financial contributions will stop, other than that it'll be fine," he said.

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsMichael Caputo eyes congressional bid House ethics panel renews probes into three GOP lawmakers The Hill's Morning Report - Barr stiff-arms House following Senate grilling MORE (R-N.Y.) also acknowledged last month that he is facing pressure from donors to ensure the GOP tax-reform proposal gets done.

Collins last month had been describing the flurry of lobbying from special interests seeking to protect favored tax provisions when a reporter asked if donors are happy with the tax-reform proposal.

“My donors are basically saying, ‘Get it done or don’t ever call me again,’” Collins replied.

On Wednesday, Senate and House Republicans struck an "agreement in principle" on a sweeping tax-cut bill.

GOP sources familiar with the conference committee talks said negotiators are now just cleaning up some of the details on paying for last-minute changes to the bill, which would lower the top individual tax rate to 37 percent and set the corporate tax rate at 21 percent, according to a person briefed on the package.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally MORE and congressional Republicans have pitched their tax-reform effort as delivering much-needed tax cuts to the middle class and U.S. businesses that would boost U.S. economic growth.

Democrats, however, have argued that the tax overhaul would amount to a massive windfall for the wealthiest Americans.