Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill

Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Memo: Biden's immigration problems reach crescendo in Del Rio Democrats face bleak outlook in Florida The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Dems attempt to tie government funding, Ida relief to debt limit MORE (R-Fla.) will support the GOP's tax bill now that the child tax credit has been expanded.

Rubio is telling colleagues he is a "yes" on the bill after having threatened to vote against it on Thursday, a source told The Hill.

A spokeswoman for Rubio confirmed he will support the measure.

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Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGraham says he hopes that Trump runs again Hillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Officials want action on cyberattacks Senate panel advances antitrust bill that eyes Google, Facebook MORE (R-Utah) have long been champions of expanding the child tax credit in an effort to provide more tax relief to lower- and middle-income families. 

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemRepublicans criticizing Afghan refugees face risks Dozens of Republican governors call for meeting with Biden on border surge Juan Williams: Shame on the anti-mandate Republicans MORE (R-S.D.) told reporters earlier on Friday that the maximum refundable amount of the credit will be $1,400 in the final tax bill, up from $1,100 in the Senate bill. With the credit amount set at $2,000, 70 percent would be refundable.

Rubio praised changes to the tax credit in tweets earlier Friday.

Noem and other Republicans on a House-Senate tax conference committee signed the conference's report Friday morning. The text of the final bill is expected to be released at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, and the House and Senate are expected to vote on the measure next week.

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Rubio's "yes" vote boosts the prospects of getting the final bill to President TrumpDonald TrumpCheney says a lot of GOP lawmakers have privately encouraged her fight against Trump Republicans criticizing Afghan refugees face risks DeVos says 'principles have been overtaken by personalities' in GOP MORE's desk before Christmas. A maximum of two Senate Republicans can vote against the bill, assuming all Democrats and independents are opposed, and it can still pass with Vice President Pence voting to break a tie.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill the Senate passed earlier this month, but said Friday he would vote for the final bill. Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsLooking to the past to secure America's clean energy future Collins to endorse LePage in Maine governor comeback bid McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike MORE (R-Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (R-Ariz.) both voted "yes" on the Senate bill but also haven't said how they will vote next week.

Lee also remains undecided.

“Sens. Rubio, Heller and Scott have done a tremendous job fighting for working families this week and they have secured a big win,” Lee said. “I look forward to reading the full text of the bill and, hopefully, supporting it.”

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainWhoopi Goldberg signs four-year deal with ABC to stay on 'The View' Collins to endorse LePage in Maine governor comeback bid Meghan McCain: Country has not 'healed' from Trump under Biden MORE (R-Ariz.) and Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (R-Miss.) both missed votes this week due to health issues. Lawmakers say they expect McCain and Cochran to return to the Senate next week to vote on the tax bill.

 

Updated at 3:25 p.m.