Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill

Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFrustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump GOP senators work to get Trump on board with new disaster aid package MORE (R-Fla.) will support the GOP's tax bill now that the child tax credit has been expanded.

Rubio is telling colleagues he is a "yes" on the bill after having threatened to vote against it on Thursday, a source told The Hill.

A spokeswoman for Rubio confirmed he will support the measure.

Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump Hillicon Valley: Google delays cutting off Huawei | GOP senators split over breaking up big tech | Report finds DNC lagging behind RNC on cybersecurity MORE (R-Utah) have long been champions of expanding the child tax credit in an effort to provide more tax relief to lower- and middle-income families. 

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemTrump touts 'BIG FIREWORKS' returning to Mt. Rushmore for July 4 American Indian tribe bans GOP governor from reservation over opposition to Keystone protestors New governors chart ambitious paths in first 100 days MORE (R-S.D.) told reporters earlier on Friday that the maximum refundable amount of the credit will be $1,400 in the final tax bill, up from $1,100 in the Senate bill. With the credit amount set at $2,000, 70 percent would be refundable.

Rubio praised changes to the tax credit in tweets earlier Friday.

Noem and other Republicans on a House-Senate tax conference committee signed the conference's report Friday morning. The text of the final bill is expected to be released at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, and the House and Senate are expected to vote on the measure next week.

Rubio's "yes" vote boosts the prospects of getting the final bill to President TrumpDonald John TrumpA better VA, with mental health services, is essential for America's veterans Pelosi, Nadler tangle on impeachment, contempt vote Trump arrives in Japan to kick off 4-day state visit MORE's desk before Christmas. A maximum of two Senate Republicans can vote against the bill, assuming all Democrats and independents are opposed, and it can still pass with Vice President Pence voting to break a tie.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerJeff Daniels blasts 'cowardice' of Senate Republicans against Trump Corker: 'I just don't' see path to challenge Trump in 2020 Ex-GOP Sen. Corker: Trump primary would be 'good thing for our country' MORE (Tenn.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill the Senate passed earlier this month, but said Friday he would vote for the final bill. Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Collins offering bill to boost battery research as GOP pushes energy 'innovation' Biden says Congress must move to protect abortion rights MORE (R-Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSen. Coons examines Amazon's privacy and data security practices for Alexa devices Oil companies join blitz for carbon tax The Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget MORE (R-Ariz.) both voted "yes" on the Senate bill but also haven't said how they will vote next week.

Lee also remains undecided.

“Sens. Rubio, Heller and Scott have done a tremendous job fighting for working families this week and they have secured a big win,” Lee said. “I look forward to reading the full text of the bill and, hopefully, supporting it.”

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainClimate change is a GOP issue, too It's Joe Biden's 2020 presidential nomination to lose Meghan McCain on Pelosi-Trump feud: 'Put this crap aside' and 'work together for America' MORE (R-Ariz.) and Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTop 5 races to watch in 2019 Bottom Line Races Dems narrowly lost show party needs to return to Howard Dean’s 50 state strategy MORE (R-Miss.) both missed votes this week due to health issues. Lawmakers say they expect McCain and Cochran to return to the Senate next week to vote on the tax bill.

 

Updated at 3:25 p.m.