Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill

Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate Dems petition Saudi king to release dissidents, US citizen Dem senator wants Trump to extend immigration protections to Venezuelans Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump MORE (R-Fla.) will support the GOP's tax bill now that the child tax credit has been expanded.

Rubio is telling colleagues he is a "yes" on the bill after having threatened to vote against it on Thursday, a source told The Hill.

A spokeswoman for Rubio confirmed he will support the measure.

Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over New Zealand coverage GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (R-Utah) have long been champions of expanding the child tax credit in an effort to provide more tax relief to lower- and middle-income families. 

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemKentucky House approves bill to let people carry concealed guns without a permit Journalists seek federal, state support for right to inform the public The Hill's 12:30 Report: First test for Trump emergency declaration MORE (R-S.D.) told reporters earlier on Friday that the maximum refundable amount of the credit will be $1,400 in the final tax bill, up from $1,100 in the Senate bill. With the credit amount set at $2,000, 70 percent would be refundable.

Rubio praised changes to the tax credit in tweets earlier Friday.

Noem and other Republicans on a House-Senate tax conference committee signed the conference's report Friday morning. The text of the final bill is expected to be released at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, and the House and Senate are expected to vote on the measure next week.

Rubio's "yes" vote boosts the prospects of getting the final bill to President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals to visit White House on Monday Transportation Dept requests formal audit of Boeing 737 Max certification MORE's desk before Christmas. A maximum of two Senate Republicans can vote against the bill, assuming all Democrats and independents are opposed, and it can still pass with Vice President Pence voting to break a tie.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Brexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (Tenn.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill the Senate passed earlier this month, but said Friday he would vote for the final bill. Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump MORE (R-Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump keeps tight grip on GOP McSally to back Trump on emergency declaration Flake: Biden 'strikes fear in a lot of Republicans' MORE (R-Ariz.) both voted "yes" on the Senate bill but also haven't said how they will vote next week.

Lee also remains undecided.

“Sens. Rubio, Heller and Scott have done a tremendous job fighting for working families this week and they have secured a big win,” Lee said. “I look forward to reading the full text of the bill and, hopefully, supporting it.”

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump steps up attacks on McCain Trump: 'I was never a fan of John McCain and I never will be' Santorum: Trump should 'send emails to a therapist' instead of tweeting MORE (R-Ariz.) and Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTop 5 races to watch in 2019 Bottom Line Races Dems narrowly lost show party needs to return to Howard Dean’s 50 state strategy MORE (R-Miss.) both missed votes this week due to health issues. Lawmakers say they expect McCain and Cochran to return to the Senate next week to vote on the tax bill.

 

Updated at 3:25 p.m.