Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill

Rubio now a 'yes' on the GOP tax bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioThe Memo: 'Whistleblower' furor gains steam Liberal super PAC launches browser extension replacing 'Mitch McConnell' with 'Moscow Mitch' Trump faces difficult balancing act with reelection campaign MORE (R-Fla.) will support the GOP's tax bill now that the child tax credit has been expanded.

Rubio is telling colleagues he is a "yes" on the bill after having threatened to vote against it on Thursday, a source told The Hill.

A spokeswoman for Rubio confirmed he will support the measure.

Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeZuckerberg woos Washington critics during visit Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers to discuss 'future internet regulation' Hillicon Valley: Election security looms over funding talks | Antitrust enforcers in turf war | Facebook details new oversight board | Apple fights EU tax bill MORE (R-Utah) have long been champions of expanding the child tax credit in an effort to provide more tax relief to lower- and middle-income families. 

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemNew South Dakota law requiring 'In God We Trust' sign to hang in public schools goes into effect Trump: If I say I should be on Mt. Rushmore, 'I will end up with such bad publicity' Transportation Department seeks to crack down on pipeline protests: report MORE (R-S.D.) told reporters earlier on Friday that the maximum refundable amount of the credit will be $1,400 in the final tax bill, up from $1,100 in the Senate bill. With the credit amount set at $2,000, 70 percent would be refundable.

Rubio praised changes to the tax credit in tweets earlier Friday.

Noem and other Republicans on a House-Senate tax conference committee signed the conference's report Friday morning. The text of the final bill is expected to be released at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, and the House and Senate are expected to vote on the measure next week.

Rubio's "yes" vote boosts the prospects of getting the final bill to President TrumpDonald John TrumpAlaska Republican Party cancels 2020 primary Ukrainian official denies Trump pressured president Trump goes after New York Times, Washington Post: 'They have gone totally CRAZY!!!!' MORE's desk before Christmas. A maximum of two Senate Republicans can vote against the bill, assuming all Democrats and independents are opposed, and it can still pass with Vice President Pence voting to break a tie.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid Meet the key Senate player in GOP fight over Saudi Arabia Trump says he's 'very happy' some GOP senators have 'gone on to greener pastures' MORE (Tenn.) was the only Republican to vote against the bill the Senate passed earlier this month, but said Friday he would vote for the final bill. Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump judicial picks face rare GOP opposition GOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan Sinema touts bipartisan record as Arizona Democrats plan censure vote MORE (R-Maine) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake donates to Democratic sheriff being challenged by Arpaio in Arizona The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says US-China trade talks to resume, hails potential trade with Japan, UK Joe Arpaio to run for Maricopa County sheriff in 2020  MORE (R-Ariz.) both voted "yes" on the Senate bill but also haven't said how they will vote next week.

Lee also remains undecided.

“Sens. Rubio, Heller and Scott have done a tremendous job fighting for working families this week and they have secured a big win,” Lee said. “I look forward to reading the full text of the bill and, hopefully, supporting it.”

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAmerica's newest comedy troupe: House GOP Michelle Malkin knocks Cokie Roberts shortly after her death: 'One of the first guilty culprits of fake news' Arizona Democratic Party will hold vote to censure Sinema MORE (R-Ariz.) and Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBiden has a lot at stake in first debate The Hill's Morning Report — Trump turns the page back to Mueller probe Trump praises Thad Cochran: 'A real senator with incredible values' MORE (R-Miss.) both missed votes this week due to health issues. Lawmakers say they expect McCain and Cochran to return to the Senate next week to vote on the tax bill.

 

Updated at 3:25 p.m.