Grassley demands answers from DOJ on Comey memos classification

Grassley demands answers from DOJ on Comey memos classification
© Greg Nash

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost The 7 most interesting nuggets from the Mueller report Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy MORE (R-Iowa) on Wednesday questioned whether former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeySarah Sanders addresses false statements detailed in Mueller report: 'A slip of the tongue' Comey tweets 'so many answers' following release of Mueller report Dems plan Monday call on Mueller report: 'Congress will not be silent' MORE violated Justice Department policy last year when he shared memos of his conversations with President TrumpDonald John TrumpButtigieg on Mueller report: 'Politically, I'm not sure it will change much' Sarah Sanders addresses false statements detailed in Mueller report: 'A slip of the tongue' Trump to visit Japan in May to meet with Abe, new emperor MORE.

In a statement Wednesday night, Grassley questioned whether leaking the memos to a Columbia professor would violate department policies.

Grassley also wrote a letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinClinton campaign chief: Mueller report 'lays out a devastating case' against Trump Mueller report shows how Trump aides sought to protect him and themselves Dem House chairs: Mueller report 'does not exonerate the president' MORE to learn more about the chain of custody for the memos, and whether Rosenstein has initiated an investigation into Comey's handling of the memos.

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Multiple memos Comey wrote as personal recollections of his interactions with President Trump about the Russia investigation contained classified information.

Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee last June that he shared at least one of the memos, which he considered personal documents, with a law professor at Columbia University. He then asked that professor to leak the information from one memo to the media in the hopes of increasing pressure to get a special prosecutor named in the Russia investigation.

Comey testified that he believed his personal memos were unclassified.

President Trump fired Comey in May.