Grassley demands answers from DOJ on Comey memos classification

Grassley demands answers from DOJ on Comey memos classification
© Greg Nash

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleySmaller tax refunds put GOP on defensive High stakes as Trump, Dems open drug price talks Senate approves border bill that prevents shutdown MORE (R-Iowa) on Wednesday questioned whether former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyWarren: Officials have duty ‘to invoke 25th amendment’ if they think Trump is unfit McCabe: Trump 'may have' committed a crime in blocking Russia probe Trump: 'Disgraced' McCabe, Rosenstein look like they were planning 'very illegal act' MORE violated Justice Department policy last year when he shared memos of his conversations with President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE.

In a statement Wednesday night, Grassley questioned whether leaking the memos to a Columbia professor would violate department policies.

Grassley also wrote a letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Warren: Officials have duty ‘to invoke 25th amendment’ if they think Trump is unfit McCabe: Trump 'may have' committed a crime in blocking Russia probe MORE to learn more about the chain of custody for the memos, and whether Rosenstein has initiated an investigation into Comey's handling of the memos.

ADVERTISEMENT

Multiple memos Comey wrote as personal recollections of his interactions with President Trump about the Russia investigation contained classified information.

Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee last June that he shared at least one of the memos, which he considered personal documents, with a law professor at Columbia University. He then asked that professor to leak the information from one memo to the media in the hopes of increasing pressure to get a special prosecutor named in the Russia investigation.

Comey testified that he believed his personal memos were unclassified.

President Trump fired Comey in May.