Booker, Harris appointed to Senate Judiciary Committee

Booker, Harris appointed to Senate Judiciary Committee
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Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate Democrats call for diversity among new Federal Reserve Bank presidents Progressives push back on decision to shrink Biden's paid family leave program Emanuel to take hot seat in Senate confirmation hearing MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisObama looks to give new momentum to McAuliffe Kamala Harris engages with heckler during New York speech Biden's safe-space CNN town hall attracts small audience, as poll numbers plummet MORE (D-Calif.) were appointed to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, making them the first African-American members of the panel since the 1990s.

Harris, the second African-American woman elected to the Senate, also becomes the second black woman to serve on the powerful Judiciary panel.

Former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun (D-Ill.) sat on the Judiciary Committee in the 1990s. Booker will be the first black man to serve on the committee. 

“The Trump administration has repeatedly demonstrated its hostility to the ideals of civil rights and equal justice for all. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I will make it my mission to check and balance President TrumpDonald TrumpYoungkin ad features mother who pushed to have 'Beloved' banned from son's curriculum White House rejects latest Trump claim of executive privilege Democrats say GOP lawmakers implicated in Jan. 6 should be expelled MORE and Attorney General Sessions,” Booker said in a statement.

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Booker testified against Sessions's nomination last year, the first time a sitting senator has testified against another sitting senator chosen for a Cabinet post.

Booker previously worked as a tenant lawyer, and served as a city council member and Newark mayor before his election to the Senate in 2013. Harris previously served as California's attorney general before joining the Senate. Both Democrats are viewed as potential 2020 presidential contenders.

The Judiciary Committee, which deals with nominations to the judiciary and Justice Department, is one of multiple congressional committees conducting separate investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSenators weigh future of methane fee in spending bill Biden hopes for deal on economic agenda before Europe trip The Senate is setting a dangerous precedent with Iron Dome funding MORE (D-N.Y.) announced new committee assignments for some party members after former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenFranken targets senators from both parties in new comedy tour Al Franken on another Senate run: 'I'm keeping my options open' Andrew Cuomo and the death of shame MORE (D-Minn) officially resigned last week, and new Alabama Sen. Doug Jones (D) was sworn in.

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric RichmondBiden to meet with business leaders amid debt ceiling pressure campaign on GOP Bottom line The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Democrats to scale back agenda MORE (D-La.) praised the new appointments, saying he urged Schumer to appoint a member of the caucus to replace Franken on the Judiciary Committee.

“The Congressional Black Caucus could not be more proud of both of our Senate members and know the experience and expertise they bring to the Committee will be beneficial for all Americans, especially those disproportionately targeted by the criminal justice system,” Richmond said in a statement.

The addition of Jones and Sen. Tina SmithTina Flint SmithSenate Democrats call for diversity among new Federal Reserve Bank presidents Progressives push back on decision to shrink Biden's paid family leave program Democrats scramble for climate alternatives MORE (D-Minn.), Franken’s replacement, shrinks the Republican advantage on the Juciicary Committee and Finance Committee to one seat each.