GOP senator: Trump did not make 's---hole' comment

Republican Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) on Sunday said President TrumpDonald John TrumpClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Missouri Gov. declares state of emergency amid severe flooding Swalwell on Hicks testimony: 'She's going to have to tell us who she lied for' in Trump admin MORE did not use the word “shithole” to refer to African nations, Haiti and El Salvador during a White House meeting with lawmakers.

During an interview on ABC’s “This Week,” Perdue said the comment attributed to the president in The Washington Post is a “gross misrepresentation.” 

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“I’m telling you he did not use that word, George. And I’m telling you it’s a gross misrepresentation. How many times do you want me to say that?” Perdue said after host George Stephanopoulos pressed him for an answer.

Perdue was one of several lawmakers participating in a meeting with Trump last week when the president reportedly referred to immigrants from African nations, El Salvador and Haiti as coming from "shithole countries."

“Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?” Trump reportedly asked.

The White House last week did not deny that Trump made the comment.

But Perdue insisted on Sunday that the language reported by the newspaper was not used during the meeting.

“The gross misrepresentation was that language was used in there that was not used and also that the tone of that meeting was not contributory and not constructive,” the Georgia Republican said.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump's intraparty feuds divide Republicans Trump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP Republicans defend McCain amid Trump attacks MORE (R-S.C.), who was also present for the meeting, said in a Friday statement that he said his "piece" to Trump over the comments.

"Following comments by the President, I said my piece directly to him yesterday. The President and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel. I've always believed that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its ideals," Graham said.