Senators float days-long funding bill

Senators float days-long funding bill

A group of senators is floating a days-long government funding bill as a longer House plan faces growing pushback in the Senate.

"I just want to make sure that people ... who want to make sure we don't have a shutdown and people who want to resolve differences know that there is an option to doing something different than a month-long [continuing resolution]," Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranSenators optimistic about reaching funding deal GOP senators read Pence riot act before shutdown votes On The Money: Shutdown Day 26 | Pelosi calls on Trump to delay State of the Union | Cites 'security concerns' | DHS chief says they can handle security | Waters lays out agenda | Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions MORE (R-Kan.) told reporters on Thursday.

Moran suggested that senators could pass stopgap bills that last only one or two days. He added that he spoke about the idea during Wednesday's closed-door Republican policy lunch. 

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Memo: Trump and McCabe go to war Graham seeks new Rosenstein testimony after explosive McCabe interview Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general MORE (R-S.C.) told reporters that he supports Moran's idea, arguing negotiators could get a deal on immigration and defense spending in days if they wanted to.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Ariz.) also said he prefers a days-long stopgap measure.

Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall Clinton on GOP promoting Trump 'stronger together' quote: Now copy my policies too MORE (D-Va.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers scramble as shutdown deadline nears Steel lobby's PR blitz can't paper over damaging effects of tariffs Drama hits Senate Intel panel’s Russia inquiry MORE (D-Va.) earlier Thursday also pitched a days-long stopgap bill to give negotiators more time when they announced their opposition to the House's bill, which funds the government through mid-February.

"We will support a short-term CR for a few days to keep the government open while we stay in town and conclude our negotiations," the two Democratic senators said.

But GOP leadership, pinning the blame for a potential shutdown squarely on Democrats, is downplaying the possibility that it would accept a shorter continuing resolution or are making back-up plans.

"No contingency plans at all. If Democrats want to shut down the government and vote against the Children's Health Insurance Program they can do it. But it makes no sense to me," Sen. John CornynJohn CornynPoll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week How the border deal came together MORE (R-Texas) told reporters.

Asked if there was a chance of a shorter-term continuing resolution, Cornyn added, "No, we're not going to do it."

“Well then you need to tell Sen. Cornyn I respect him a lot, but he needs to get 60 votes. Good luck," Graham told CNN, asked about Cornyn shooting down the days-long fix.

The talk of contingency plans come as the House measure has a narrow path to getting through the Senate.

With two GOP senators voting no, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGreen New Deal Resolution invites big picture governing ‘Contingency’ spending in 3B budget deal comes under fire Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault MORE (R-Ky.) will need at least 11 Democratic votes to pass the funding bill.

Congress has until midnight Friday to prevent a shutdown, with the House expected to vote on its bill on Thursday evening.

Updated at 1:10 p.m.