SPONSORED:

Trump-state Dems introduce bill to withhold lawmaker pay during shutdown

Trump-state Dems introduce bill to withhold lawmaker pay during shutdown
© Getty Images

Five Democratic senators from states won by President TrumpDonald Trump Pence said he's 'proud' Congress certified Biden's win on Jan. 6 Americans put the most trust in their doctor for COVID-19 information: poll OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Biden administration to evacuate Afghans who helped US l Serious differences remain between US and Iran on nuclear talks l US, Turkish officials meet to discuss security plans for Afghan airport MORE in the 2016 presidential election introduced legislation Friday to withhold pay from members of Congress in the event of a government shutdown.

Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampSupreme Court battle could wreak havoc with Biden's 2020 agenda Effective and profitable climate solutions are within the nation's farms and forests Bill Maher blasts removal of journalist at Teen Vogue MORE (N.D.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillSupreme Court battle could wreak havoc with Biden's 2020 agenda The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Jan. 6 commission vote delayed; infrastructure debate lingers into June Missouri Republicans move to block Greitens in key Senate race MORE (Mo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterWhite House digs in as infrastructure talks stall White House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure Biden risks break with progressives on infrastructure MORE (Mont.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowWhite House digs in as infrastructure talks stall Racial reparations at the USDA Excellence Act will expand mental health and substance use treatment access to millions MORE (Mich.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinRevs. Jesse Jackson, William Barber arrested in protest urging Manchin to nix filibuster Democrats introduce equal pay legislation for US national team athletes Democrats seek to calm nervous left MORE (W.Va.), all of whom are up for reelection this year, announced the bill Friday, hours ahead of a government funding deadline.

“If members of Congress can’t fulfill their basic duty to keep the government open and provide the essential services Americans depend on, then they don’t deserve their paychecks,” Heitkamp said in a statement. “Period.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

Stabenow echoed Heitkamp’s remarks in the statement and vowed to donate her salary in the event of a shutdown even if the bill doesn’t pass.

“It’s wrong that members of Congress would still get paid in the event of a shutdown while paychecks for members of our military could be disrupted,” Stabenow said. “This bill ensures members of Congress will not get paid and another bill I have cosponsored makes sure our troops will."

Democratic Reps. Sean Patrick Maloney (N.Y.) and Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyOvernight Health Care: US buying additional 200M Moderna vaccine doses | CureVac's COVID-19 vaccine failed in preliminary trial results | Grassley meets with House Dems on drug prices Grassley meets with moderate House Democrats on lowering drug prices Demings raises Democrats' hopes in uphill fight to defeat Rubio MORE (Fla.) also vowed Friday to forgo their pay if the government shuts down.

The announcement comes as Congress barrels towards the first government shutdown since 2013.

House Republicans passed a short-term government spending bill Thursday, but Senate Democrats have vowed to block the bill when it comes up for a vote.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerDemocrats seek to calm nervous left Biden says he won't sign bipartisan bill without reconciliation bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senators, White House to meet on potential infrastructure deal MORE (D-N.Y.) met with President Trump at the White House Friday but left the meeting without a deal to avert a shutdown, saying there are still a “good number of disagreements” with Trump on immigration and spending.

The Senate is expected to take a vote on the House-passed spending bill Friday evening, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRevs. Jesse Jackson, William Barber arrested in protest urging Manchin to nix filibuster On The Money: Biden announces bipartisan deal on infrastructure, but Democratic leaders hold out for more McConnell slams Biden for already 'caving' to left on infrastructure deal MORE (R-KY.) is expected to fall short of the 60 votes necessary.