Gorsuch has dinner at GOP senator’s home

Gorsuch has dinner at GOP senator’s home
© Greg Nash

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch dined Monday night with Republican senators and other Washington officials.

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump Overnight Health Care: Poll finds most Americans misunderstand scope of 'Medicare for All' | Planned Parenthood chief readies for 2020 | Drugmakers' lawsuit ramps up fight with Trump Trump's health care focus puts GOP on edge MORE (R-Tenn.) said Monday night that he was among Sen. John CornynJohn CornynWillie Nelson on supporting O'Rourke: 'Anything he wants to do, I'm with Beto' Willie Nelson on supporting O'Rourke: 'Anything he wants to do, I'm with Beto' Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner MORE’s (R-Texas) dinner guests, along with Gorsuch, Transportation Secretary Elaine ChaoElaine Lan ChaoOn The Money: Democrats move funding bills as budget caps deal remains elusive | Companies line up to weigh in on 0B China tariffs | Trudeau to talk trade with Pelosi, McConnell On The Money: Democrats move funding bills as budget caps deal remains elusive | Companies line up to weigh in on 0B China tariffs | Trudeau to talk trade with Pelosi, McConnell Progressive group requests Transportation Department look into Chao's potential conflicts of interest MORE and other senators.

Chao is married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request MORE (R-Ky.).

ADVERTISEMENT

Further details of the dinner were not immediately made known. The dinner did not appear to violate the Code of Conduct for United States Judges, which advises that judges "should refrain from political activity."

Gorsuch was nominated to the Supreme Court roughly a year ago to replace the late Antonin Scalia. 

He was subject to a tense confirmation hearing, with Democrats nearly unanimously opposing his nomination. The Senate ultimately confirmed him in April with a 54-45 vote.

Republicans used the "nuclear option" during the proceedings, changing Senate rules so that a simple majority would be enough to confirm Gorsuch.