Rubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’

Rubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFreedom to Compete Act would benefit many American workers Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes Dems say attorney general undermined credibility with Trump talking point MORE (R-Fla.) is working with Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpA Trump visit to Africa is important — and carries some urgency On The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job MORE to craft a paid family leave plan that will appeal to fellow Republicans, Politico reported Sunday.

“We still have to work on members of my own party. I think there will be significant initial resistance to it, because it’s just not an issue that’s been identified with the Republican Party,” Rubio told the news outlet.

Rubio is reportedly considering a plan that would allow people to dip into Social Security benefits to take time off. Such a proposal would address concerns of Republicans who don’t want to raise taxes to pay for family leave.

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Rubio is still in the early stages of crafting a paid family leave package, according to Politico.

Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDems sound alarm over top DOJ nominee Restore Pell Grant eligibility to people in prison Former Democratic aide pleads guilty to doxing GOP senators attending Kavanaugh hearing MORE (R-Utah) have sought feedback from the president's eldest daughter on their ideas for a family leave program, Politico reported. 

Trump, who serves as a senior adviser to the president, outlined her support for paid family leave in an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal last month. She argued a national paid-leave program would be “an investment in America’s working families” that would spur the economy and benefit women in particular.

Members of both parties have recently put forth legislation to provide paid family leave, but they have been unable to reach consensus on the details of such a bill.