FEATURED:

Corker comes out against Senate budget deal

Corker comes out against Senate budget deal
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCorker: US must determine responsibility in Saudi journalist's death Dem senator calls for US action after 'preposterous' Saudi explanation Schumer: Fight for Senate is 'neck and neck' MORE (R-Tenn.) said on Thursday that he will oppose the bipartisan two-year budget deal, citing concerns about the deficit.

"To say I am discouraged by the outcome of these negotiations would be an understatement," he said.

The Senate is expected to vote Thursday on the deal, which lifts the budget caps by roughly $300 billion over two years and raises the debt ceiling until March 2019.

ADVERTISEMENT

Corker, a fiscal hawk, added that the agreement "perpetuates the abuse" of a war account not subjected to the budget restrictions and "tees up" another spending fight in two years. 

"It is also only partially offset, and most of those offsets occur years from now, doubling down on the irresponsible mentality in Congress of spend-now-pay-later," he said.

Last year, Corker, who is retiring after 2018, threatened to oppose the GOP tax plan over similar concerns about the deficit before ultimately voting for the final bill.

Fiscal hawks have blasted the agreement, arguing it blows a hole in spending. It would boost funding for the Pentagon and nondefense domestic programs by about $300 billion over current levels over the next two fiscal years, but lawmakers said that only about $100 billion of that would be offset.

The conservative House Freedom Caucus took an official position against the measure on Wednesday evening.

“This spending proposal is disgusting and reckless — the biggest spending increase since 2009,” Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashWatchdog files Hatch Act complaint against Sanders for picture with Kanye in MAGA hat Cook Political Report shifts 7 more races towards Dems Rand Paul ramps up his alliance with Trump MORE (R-Mich.) tweeted. “I urge every American to speak out against this fiscal insanity.”

But the Senate is expected to easily pass the bill, which also includes a short-term extension of government funding.

During a Thursday interview, Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMeghan McCain calls Russian attacks against her father the 'highest compliment' to her family Atheist group argues in court for prayer rights on House floor Small-dollar donations explode in the Trump era MORE (R-Wis.) said he believes the package also has the votes to pass the House.

“I think we will,” Ryan told radio show host Hugh Hewitt. “I feel good. Part of it depends on the Democrats. This is a bipartisan bill. It’s going to need bipartisan support.”