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Senate panel pushes bill protecting Mueller to next week

Senate panel pushes bill protecting Mueller to next week
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The Senate Judiciary Committee is punting a bill limiting President TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Ivanka Trump doubles down on vaccine push with post celebrating second shot Conservative Club for Growth PAC comes out against Stefanik to replace Cheney MORE's ability to fire special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE into next week, instead of considering it on Thursday. 

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSenate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap Lawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' Senate Democrats call on Biden to restore oversight of semiautomatic and sniper rifle exports MORE (D-Calif.) said she and Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGrassley asks Blinken to provide potential conflicts involving John Kerry Overnight Defense: Gillibrand makes new push for military sexual assault reform | US troops begin leaving Afghanistan | Biden budget delay pushes back annual defense policy bill Gillibrand makes new push for military sexual assault reform MORE (R-Iowa), the committee chairman, had "agreed to not take action this week but instead place the bill on the committee’s markup calendar next week."

"I’m worried about an amendment we haven’t been able to review that could undermine the investigation," she said. 

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Asked what amendment Feinstein, the top Democrat on the committee, was referring to, her spokesman pointed toward a recent New York Times article. 
 
GOP committee aides told the Times that Grassley wants to offer an amendment that would require the Justice Department to give a report to Congress when there is a change in the scope of a special counsel investigation or if the special counsel is fired.
 
Pushing the legislation into next week is a delay from Grassley's request to put it under the committee's agenda for a business meeting on Thursday.

Grassley aides noted earlier Wednesday that the GOP senator needed Feinstein to sign off on changing Thursday's agenda because it was within 72 hours of the meeting.

Taylor Foy, a spokesman for Grassley, confirmed on Wednesday evening that Grassley would place the bill on the agenda for the first time next week instead of Thursday. 

"Because of Sen. Feinstein’s decision, the Committee will now vote on the special counsel bill on April 26 instead of April 19," he said.

The timeline implies that the bill will be added to a committee markup on Thursday, April 19, though it is not yet listed on the committee's website. 

And under committee rules, any one member can delay the legislation once it's been placed on the agenda for a week. 

Several members on the committee are opposed to or have concerns about the legislation, meaning it will likely be delayed an additional week, setting up a vote for April 26. 

The legislation, from Sens. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsUS, Iran signal possible breakthroughs in nuke talks How the United States can pass Civics 101 Americans for Prosperity launches campaign targeting six Democrats to oppose ending filibuster MORE (D-Del.), Cory BookerCory BookerNever underestimate Joe Biden Police reform talks ramp up amid pressure from Biden, families Victims' relatives hold Capitol Hill meetings to push police reform MORE (D-N.J.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSenate hears from Biden's high-profile judicial nominees for first time Senate Democrats take aim at 'true lender' interest rate rule Former North Carolina chief justice launches Senate campaign MORE (R-N.C.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Memo: The GOP's war is already over — Trump won Michael Flynn flubs words to Pledge of Allegiance at pro-Trump rally MORE (R-S.C.), would let Mueller, or any other special counsel, receive an "expedited judicial review" within 10 days of being fired to determine if it was for a "good cause." 
 
If it wasn't, the special counsel would be reinstated. The measure would also codify existing regulations that only a senior Justice Department official can fire a special counsel and that they must provide the reason in writing.
 
Updated at 7:04 p.m.