Schumer says Trump strikes 'appropriate,' warns against greater involvement in Syria

 Schumer says Trump strikes 'appropriate,' warns against greater involvement in Syria
© Greg Nash

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden administration stokes frustration over Canada Schumer blasts McCarthy for picking people who 'supported the big lie' for Jan. 6 panel Biden's belated filibuster decision: A pretense of principle at work MORE (D-N.Y.) said Friday that President TrumpDonald TrumpNew Capitol Police chief to take over Friday Overnight Health Care: Biden officials says no change to masking guidance right now | Missouri Supreme Court rules in favor of Medicaid expansion | Mississippi's attorney general asks Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade Michael Wolff and the art of monetizing gossip MORE's decision to mount a military strike on Syria was "appropriate," but warned against deepening the United States's involvement in the war-torn country. 

"A pinpointed, limited action to punish and hopefully deter Assad from doing this again is appropriate, but the administration has to be careful about not getting us into a greater and more involved war in Syria," Schumer said in a statement.

Schumer's comments came shortly after Trump announced that the U.S., France and the United Kingdom had launched "precision strikes" on targets in Syria in response to an apparent chemical weapons attack in a suburb of Damascus that left dozens dead.

ADVERTISEMENT

The U.S. and other Western countries have blamed the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad for mounting the chemical strike last weekend that left more than 40 people dead in the Syrian town of Douma.

Syria and its allies, Russia and Iran, have denied that Assad's government used chemical weapons. Russia accused the U.K. on Friday of staging the attack.

Vice President Pence, who is in Lima, Peru, returned to his hotel on Friday night to make calls notifying congressional leaders of the strike.

Pence spoke with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellS.E. Cupp: 'The politicization of science and health safety has inarguably cost lives' Poll: Potential Sununu-Hassan matchup in N.H. a dead heat  Business groups urge lawmakers to stick with bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (R-Ky.), Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump clash ahead: Ron DeSantis positions himself as GOP's future in a direct-mail piece Cutting critical family support won't solve the labor crisis Juan Williams: Trump's GOP descends into farce MORE (R-Wis.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcements GOP's Banks burnishes brand with Pelosi veto Meghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' MORE (D-Calif.).

Pence was apparently unable to immediately reach Schumer, who was on a plane, the vice president's deputy chief of staff told reporters traveling in Peru.

An aide to the vice president emailed a member of Schumer's staff saying that Pence needed to speak with the senator, according to Pence's team.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Senators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers Hillicon Valley: Senators introduce bill to require some cyber incident reporting | UK citizen arrested in connection to 2020 Twitter hack | Officials warn of cyber vulnerabilities in water systems MORE (Va.), the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, also voiced support on Friday for a "measured" military response in Syria. But he similarly warned in a statement against taking actions that could "further destabilize" the region or expand the conflict.

"While the U.S. and our allies must not turn a blind eye to Assad's vile and inhumane attacks against his own citizens, military action in Syria must be measured, as part of a coherent strategy to prevent Assad from using chemical weapons without further destabilizing an already-volatile region or inadvertently expanding the conflict," he said.