Duckworth brings her baby to Senate vote, drawing a crowd

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick Missouri Republican wins annual craft brewing competition for lawmakers MORE (D-Ill.) on Thursday took advantage of a new Senate rule to bring her infant daughter with her to cast a vote on the floor.

Senate leaders held the confirmation vote for Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineTrump speaks with NASA astronauts on all-female spacewalk NASA makes historic all-female spacewalk NASA reveals new spacesuits for next moon mission MORE to be NASA administrator for nearly an hour to allow Duckworth and her daughter, Maile, to come in, for Duckworth’s first vote since giving birth earlier this month.

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Duckworth voted against Bridenstine. He was nonetheless confirmed, 50 to 49, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed.

Her trip to the floor was historic, and thought to be the first time an infant has been on the Senate floor.

Up until Wednesday, the Senate didn’t allow any children onto the floor. Congress’s upper chamber is notorious for strict rules from decorum to attire.

Senators voted unanimously on Wednesday to allow children under one year of age onto the floor. Duckworth pushed the resolution along with other Senate women, due to Duckworth’s concerns about being away from her daughter and not nursing her.

Duckworth, an Iraq War veteran who lost both of her legs when her helicopter was hit by a grenade, was in her wheelchair for the vote, carrying her daughter in a sling.
 
Duckworth and her daughter came into the Senate chamber greeted by applause from senators. They quickly attracted a bipartisan throng of senators to admire Maile, including Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillIranian attacks expose vulnerability of campaign email accounts Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Ocasio-Cortez blasts NYT editor for suggesting Tlaib, Omar aren't representative of Midwest MORE (D-Mo.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDeVos calls Democratic presidential hopeful's education plans 'crazy' Senate Democrats want Warren to talk costs on 'Medicare for All' Biden struggles to reverse fall MORE (D-Minn.), Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTurkey says soldier killed despite cease-fire in Syria Schumer calls for FDA to probe reports of contaminated baby food How Trump and Pelosi went from bad to worse MORE (D-N.Y.), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeVulnerable senators hold the key to Trump's fate Trump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong How to survive an impeachment MORE (R-Ariz.), Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTurkey sanctions face possible wall in GOP Senate Fox's Wallace says 'well-connected' Republican told him there's a 20 percent chance GOP will vote for impeachment White House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours MORE (R-Ky.), Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDemocrats urge Rick Perry not to roll back lightbulb efficiency rules Biz groups say Warren labor plan would be disaster Freedom of the press under fire in Colorado MORE (D-Wash.) and Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick Democratic senators condemn Trump for calling on China to investigate Bidens MORE (D-Ore.).
 
McCaskill joked that Maile is “wearing a blazer,” abiding by the Senate’s strict dress rules. Duckworth joked on Twitter earlier Thursday that she had prepared an outfit for Maile, complete with a blazer.  

“I’m not sure what the policy is on duckling onesies, but I think we’re ready,” Duckworth tweeted. The girl also had a pink hat — technically prohibited by Senate rules for dress on the floor — and a white blanket.

Senators eventually noticed dozens of reporters in the gallery above gawking at Duckworth and Maile. “The press is finally interested in something worthwhile,” yelled Schumer.

Maile, Duckworth’s second daughter, was born April 9. Her entrance on the Senate floor also made a splash on Twitter:

Duckworth is the first sitting senator to give birth. 

-Updated 3:15 p.m.