Duckworth brings her baby to Senate vote, drawing a crowd

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthDems punch back over GOP holdup of Biden SBA nominee Top Republican: General told senators he opposed Afghanistan withdrawal Democrats brace for battle on Biden's .5 trillion spending plan MORE (D-Ill.) on Thursday took advantage of a new Senate rule to bring her infant daughter with her to cast a vote on the floor.

Senate leaders held the confirmation vote for Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineSpaceX all-civilian crew returns to Earth, successfully completing 3-day mission SpaceX all-civilian crew calls Tom Cruise from space How will Biden's Afghanistan debacle impact NASA's Artemis return to the moon? MORE to be NASA administrator for nearly an hour to allow Duckworth and her daughter, Maile, to come in, for Duckworth’s first vote since giving birth earlier this month.

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Duckworth voted against Bridenstine. He was nonetheless confirmed, 50 to 49, with all Republicans in favor and all Democrats opposed.

Her trip to the floor was historic, and thought to be the first time an infant has been on the Senate floor.

Up until Wednesday, the Senate didn’t allow any children onto the floor. Congress’s upper chamber is notorious for strict rules from decorum to attire.

Senators voted unanimously on Wednesday to allow children under one year of age onto the floor. Duckworth pushed the resolution along with other Senate women, due to Duckworth’s concerns about being away from her daughter and not nursing her.

Duckworth, an Iraq War veteran who lost both of her legs when her helicopter was hit by a grenade, was in her wheelchair for the vote, carrying her daughter in a sling.
 
Duckworth and her daughter came into the Senate chamber greeted by applause from senators. They quickly attracted a bipartisan throng of senators to admire Maile, including Sens. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillRepublicans may regret restricting reproductive rights Sunday shows preview: States deal with fallout of Ida; Texas abortion law takes effect Giuliani to stump for Greitens in Missouri MORE (D-Mo.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Officials want action on cyberattacks Senate panel advances antitrust bill that eyes Google, Facebook This week: Democrats face mounting headaches MORE (D-Minn.), Charles SchumerChuck SchumerDemocrats press Schumer on removing Confederate statues from Capitol Democrats' do-or-die moment Biden touts 'progress' during 'candid' meetings on .5T plan MORE (D-N.Y.), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (R-Ariz.), Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP should grab the chance to upend Pelosi's plan on reconciliation We don't need platinum to solve the debt ceiling crisis The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble MORE (R-Ky.), Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayBuilding strong public health capacity across the US Texas abortion law creates 2022 headache for GOP Top Democrat says he'll push to address fossil fuel tax breaks in spending bill MORE (D-Wash.) and Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Energy & Environment — Presented by the League of Conservation Voters — Senate Finance chair backs budget action on fossil fuel subsidies Top Democrat says he'll push to address fossil fuel tax breaks in spending bill Democrats revive filibuster fight over voting rights bill MORE (D-Ore.).
 
McCaskill joked that Maile is “wearing a blazer,” abiding by the Senate’s strict dress rules. Duckworth joked on Twitter earlier Thursday that she had prepared an outfit for Maile, complete with a blazer.  

“I’m not sure what the policy is on duckling onesies, but I think we’re ready,” Duckworth tweeted. The girl also had a pink hat — technically prohibited by Senate rules for dress on the floor — and a white blanket.

Senators eventually noticed dozens of reporters in the gallery above gawking at Duckworth and Maile. “The press is finally interested in something worthwhile,” yelled Schumer.

Maile, Duckworth’s second daughter, was born April 9. Her entrance on the Senate floor also made a splash on Twitter:

Duckworth is the first sitting senator to give birth. 

-Updated 3:15 p.m.