GOP faces internal battle over changing Senate rules

Senate Republicans are battling over whether to use the so-called nuclear option to speed up consideration of President TrumpDonald John TrumpHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Celebrating 'Hispanic Heritage Month' in the Age of Trump Let's not play Charlie Brown to Iran's Lucy MORE’s nominees.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellO'Rourke responds to Buttigieg's gun criticism: 'That calculation and fear is what got us here in the first place' Cicilline on Trump investigations versus legislation: 'We have to do both' The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation MORE (R-Ky.) is under pressure from conservative colleagues and outside groups to change the Senate’s rules to ensure a quicker pace on Trump’s court picks.

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Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHarris bashes Kavanaugh's 'sham' nomination process, calls for his impeachment after sexual misconduct allegation Sunday shows - Guns dominate after Democratic debate Cruz on reported Kavanaugh allegations: There's nobody Democrats don't want to impeach MORE (R-Texas), Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesConservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal 5 takeaways from combative Democratic debate MORE (R-Mont.) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonDemocratic senator warns O'Rourke AR-15 pledge could haunt party for years Conservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks Hillicon Valley: Google to promote original reporting | Senators demand answers from Amazon on worker treatment | Lawmakers weigh response to ransomware attacks MORE (R-Wis.) all want to change the rules to a simple majority vote — a tactic known as the “nuclear option” because it is so controversial.

But moderates such as Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann Murkowski The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Overnight Energy: Trump administration to repeal waterway protections| House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge| Administration takes key step to open Alaskan refuge to drilling by end of year Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare MORE (R-Alaska) aren’t comfortable with using the maneuver because it will further inflame partisan passions in the chamber.

“If we’re going to change the rules, I want to be able to change the rules in the right way,” she told The Hill, expressing her preference for a bipartisan vote.

She said muscling through the changes over Democratic objections will just lead Democrats to do the same thing when they have the Senate majority.

“When we try to muscle things through, then you get in the position when the shoe’s on the other foot, when the other side’s in charge, we try to change it again, try to muscle it through on that side,” she said. 

Murkowski is one of at least two Senate Republicans opposed to going nuclear.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret Collins The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Congress passes bill to begin scenic byways renaissance Senators say Trump open to expanding background checks MORE (R-Maine) told The Hill last year that she did not support the rules change and has voiced opposition to it within the GOP conference.

Other Republicans, however, are losing patience.

“We continue to witness historic obstruction by Senate Democrats when it comes to funding the government and confirming nominations,” said Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.).

Perdue noted on Friday that there are only 71 working days left in the fiscal year — and only 43 excluding Mondays and Fridays, when the Senate rarely works full days.

Perdue said the Senate should start working “around the clock” to catch up on passing spending bills and “break through the backlog of confirmations.”

“We need to speed up the process,” he said.

The rules are normally changed by a two-thirds vote of the entire chamber or by issuing a standing order, with 60 votes. Either way, rules and precedent changes traditionally require bipartisanship.

The nuclear option requires a simple majority vote, but with Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCain The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Biden's debate performance renews questions of health At debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR MORE (R-Ariz.) at home in Arizona battling cancer, Republicans have a razor-thin majority of 50-49.

They cannot afford a single defection on an attempt to change the rules unilaterally.

Outside conservative groups are gearing up for a battle over Trump’s nominees.

The Judicial Crisis Network on Thursday launched a million-dollar television and digital advertising campaign targeting Senate Democrats for slow-walking Trump’s judicial nominees.

Carrie Severino, the group’s chief counsel and policy director, said if Democrats refuse to vote to limit debate time for nominees, “then the level of obstruction has become such that they would need to change the rules with 51 votes.”

“We’ve gone from 108 judicial vacancies when Trump took office to 180 and that’s shocking,” she added.

Severino declined to say, however, whether her group would run ads targeting Murkowski and other Republicans who balk at using the nuclear option.

A second Republican strategist predicted that moderate GOP senators will be hit by pressure ads from conservative groups.

“My understanding is that most of the members are ready to do it and there’s some question of a couple holdouts,” the strategist said, requesting anonymity to discuss internal conference deliberations.

“McConnell has to decide he needs to do it and make his case to the holdouts,” the source added.

If Murkowski and Collins resist the leadership’s push to employ the nuclear option, the GOP strategist said groups would try to persuade them privately before resorting to public pressure tactics.

McConnell is racing to confirm as many judges as he can before the end of the year.

He set up procedural votes on six circuit court nominees before Congress left for a weeklong early May recess.

The problem he faces is that Senate rules require up to 30 hours of debate to lapse on the floor after members vote on cloture, the motion that sets up a final vote on a nominee.

Republicans have proposed reinstating a rule from 2013 that limits debate on a District Court judge to two hours, debate for most other nominees to eight hours, and keeps the 30-hour debate limit for Supreme Court, circuit court and Cabinet nominees.

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSinema says she would back Kennedy in race against Markey Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall Pelosi: 'People are dying' because McConnell won't bring up gun legislation MORE (D-N.Y.), however, isn’t going along with it. He says things have changed too much since both parties agreed to limit debate time for nominees at the start of the 113th Congress.

Schumer argued in a floor speech last month that Republicans had already taken “brazen steps this Congress to limit minority rights on nominations” by using the nuclear option in April of 2017 to confirm Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

He also cited McConnell’s decision in 2016 to refuse a Judiciary Committee hearing or floor vote for Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandSupreme Court comes to Trump's aid on immigration Gorsuch: Those who don't have 'great confidence in America' should 'look elsewhere' Trump stacking lower courts MORE, former President Obama’s choice to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

“It takes a lot of gall to complain about obstruction when Leader McConnell opened the gates to obstruction, made obstruction his watchword when he did what he did to Merrick Garland,” Schumer fumed.