Senate Dems urge Trump to remain in Iran deal ahead of announcement

Senate Dems urge Trump to remain in Iran deal ahead of announcement
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A dozen leading Senate Democrats wrote to President TrumpDonald TrumpMcAuliffe takes tougher stance on Democrats in Washington Democrats troll Trump over Virginia governor's race Tom Glavine, Ric Flair, Doug Flutie to join Trump for Herschel Walker event MORE on Monday to urge him not to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.

The letter, signed by the top-ranking Democrats on various Senate committees, comes as lawmakers and foreign leaders make last-minute pitches to the president ahead of his announcement on the future of the agreement.

"If the United States unilaterally withdraws from the [nuclear accord], Iran could either remain in the agreement and seek to isolate the United States from our closest partners, or resume its nuclear activities. Either scenario would be detrimental to our national security interests," the senators wrote.

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The 2015 deal between Iran, the U.S., Germany, France, the United Kingdom, China, Russia and the European Union offered Tehran sanctions relief in exchange for curbing its nuclear program.

Trump is set to announce his decision on whether to remain in the deal on Tuesday afternoon at the White House.

The senators warned that withdrawing from the Iran deal would undermine ongoing talks with North Korea about denuclearization, and harm U.S. national security.

"We urge you to work with our partners and allies to address Iran’s other malign activities while preserving and building upon with our allies the strict nuclear limitations of the [agreement]," they wrote.

Trump has repeatedly railed against the deal, calling it "terrible" and "the worst ever," arguing it is too lenient on Iran.

Many foreign leaders have lobbied for Trump to remain in the deal, saying there is no better option on the table.

Iran has said it will not stay in the arrangement without the United States.