Klobuchar jokes Melania Trump displaced her as 'most famous Slovenian-American'

Minnesota Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Warren leads in speaking time during debate MORE (D) joked Saturday during a commencement address at the University of Minnesota Morris that first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpMelania Trump breaks ground on new White House tennis pavilion Overnight Health Care — Presented by Coalition Against Surprise Medical Billing — Buttigieg unveils aggressive plan to lower drug prices | Supreme Court abortion case poses major test for Trump picks | Trump takes heat from right over vaping crackdown Kroger to stop sales of e-cigarettes at stores MORE has overtaken her as the most famous Slovenian-American in the country.

In her address, the senator cautioned graduates they were entering a "chaotic" world.

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"There's a lot of change going on. Believe me, I know," Klobuchar told the assembly. "I was officially displaced, you may not know it, but officially displaced as the most famous Slovenian-American by Melania Trump," she joked. 

According to Klobuchar, Melania Trump was born an hour away from where her relatives are from.

Klobuchar continued by saying that she had joked to President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE at the National Prayer Breakfast that looking at his wife, Melania, was like "looking in the mirror."

"As I said at a prayer breakfast with the president next to me — and he laughed — every time I look at her, it is like looking in the mirror," Klobuchar quipped.

Klobuchar also knocked news outlets like CBS News and The Economist in her speech for studies and articles questioning why millennials are "killing" various industries, such as bar soap and diamonds.

"I would say send a copy of your student loans, maybe they will have an answer," Klobuchar joked. She went on to add that she is not worried about the future of those industries, or the world as it is left to younger generations' hands.

"When I look out into this crowd, I don't worry about the future of soap, brunch or diamond rings or about the future of the nation," the senator concluded. "I believe our future is in good hands because it is in your hands."