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Klobuchar jokes Melania Trump displaced her as 'most famous Slovenian-American'

Minnesota Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D) joked Saturday during a commencement address at the University of Minnesota Morris that first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Pelosi, Mnuchin push stimulus talks forward, McConnell applies brakes Melania Trump cancels campaign appearance over 'lingering cough' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by the Walton Family Foundation — DOJ to file antitrust suit against Google | Trump calls for Hunter Biden probe before Nov. 3 | Trump, Biden mics will have muting feature at Thursday debate | Pa. ballots to be counted MORE has overtaken her as the most famous Slovenian-American in the country.

In her address, the senator cautioned graduates they were entering a "chaotic" world.

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"There's a lot of change going on. Believe me, I know," Klobuchar told the assembly. "I was officially displaced, you may not know it, but officially displaced as the most famous Slovenian-American by Melania Trump," she joked. 

According to Klobuchar, Melania Trump was born an hour away from where her relatives are from.

Klobuchar continued by saying that she had joked to President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE at the National Prayer Breakfast that looking at his wife, Melania, was like "looking in the mirror."

"As I said at a prayer breakfast with the president next to me — and he laughed — every time I look at her, it is like looking in the mirror," Klobuchar quipped.

Klobuchar also knocked news outlets like CBS News and The Economist in her speech for studies and articles questioning why millennials are "killing" various industries, such as bar soap and diamonds.

"I would say send a copy of your student loans, maybe they will have an answer," Klobuchar joked. She went on to add that she is not worried about the future of those industries, or the world as it is left to younger generations' hands.

"When I look out into this crowd, I don't worry about the future of soap, brunch or diamond rings or about the future of the nation," the senator concluded. "I believe our future is in good hands because it is in your hands."