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Klobuchar jokes Melania Trump displaced her as 'most famous Slovenian-American'

Minnesota Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharTech companies duke it out at Senate hearing Big Tech set to defend app stores in antitrust hearing Jimmy Carter remembers Mondale as 'best vice president in our country's history' MORE (D) joked Saturday during a commencement address at the University of Minnesota Morris that first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpFox News's Bret Baier posts vaccination selfie The Memo: Specter of vaccine hesitancy rises after J&J blow Trump says Prince Philip's death an 'irreplaceable loss' for UK MORE has overtaken her as the most famous Slovenian-American in the country.

In her address, the senator cautioned graduates they were entering a "chaotic" world.

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"There's a lot of change going on. Believe me, I know," Klobuchar told the assembly. "I was officially displaced, you may not know it, but officially displaced as the most famous Slovenian-American by Melania Trump," she joked. 

According to Klobuchar, Melania Trump was born an hour away from where her relatives are from.

Klobuchar continued by saying that she had joked to President TrumpDonald TrumpUS gives examples of possible sanctions relief to Iran GOP lawmaker demands review over FBI saying baseball shooting was 'suicide by cop' House passes bill aimed at stopping future Trump travel ban MORE at the National Prayer Breakfast that looking at his wife, Melania, was like "looking in the mirror."

"As I said at a prayer breakfast with the president next to me — and he laughed — every time I look at her, it is like looking in the mirror," Klobuchar quipped.

Klobuchar also knocked news outlets like CBS News and The Economist in her speech for studies and articles questioning why millennials are "killing" various industries, such as bar soap and diamonds.

"I would say send a copy of your student loans, maybe they will have an answer," Klobuchar joked. She went on to add that she is not worried about the future of those industries, or the world as it is left to younger generations' hands.

"When I look out into this crowd, I don't worry about the future of soap, brunch or diamond rings or about the future of the nation," the senator concluded. "I believe our future is in good hands because it is in your hands."