Dems request threat assessment over Trump's cellphone usage

Dems request threat assessment over Trump's cellphone usage
© Greg Nash

Democratic senators are requesting that the intelligence community conduct a threat assessment on President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE's cellphone usage, asking if he's compromised classified information.

Democratic Sens. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichElection Countdown: What to watch in final primaries | Dems launch M ad buy for Senate races | Senate seats most likely to flip | Trump slump worries GOP | Koch network's new super PAC Rand Paul endorses Gary Johnson's Senate bid The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s legal jeopardy mounts after Manafort, Cohen felony counts MORE (N.M.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (Ore.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTop Senate Dem: Public hearing is ‘only way to go’ for Kavanaugh accuser Durbin calls for delay in Kavanaugh vote Dems engage in last-ditch effort to block Kavanaugh MORE (Ill.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDem rep who met with Kavanaugh accuser: 'She wanted her truth to come out' Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC MORE (Calif.) sent a letter Thursday to Bill Evanina, Trump's counterintelligence chief, asking if information has or could be stolen by foreign governments. 

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"We are especially concerned about recent reporting that President Trump has eschewed the advice of counterintelligence experts and opted to use unsecured commercial devices for telephone calls and internet use. We believe this conduct is reckless and could endanger sensitive U.S. national security interests," the Democratic senators wrote. 

Politico reported last month that Trump was going "rouge" on his phone security by using a White House cellphone to tweet, a phone, it said, that does not have the same level of security as his predecessors' phones. 

Democrats also raised a red flag about the cellphone Trump uses to make calls having a camera and microphone, arguing such features "could be used to spy on the President and listen in on classified national security discussions." 

Democrats want the threat assessment "to determine whether sensitive government information has been exposed and whether plans, strategies, operations, or classified information have been or could be compromised by foreign adversaries due to the President’s cell phone usage." 

In addition to a threat assessment, the Democratic senators are requesting more information on unauthorized mobile surveillance devices being used more broadly around Washington, D.C.

"Although DHS has not attributed the cell-site simulator deployment to any specific entity, it is possible that foreign intelligence services or nefarious actors could attempt to intercept the President’s unsecured conversations," they wrote.