Ivanka Trump to press Senate on vocational training bill

Ivanka Trump to press Senate on vocational training bill
© Greg Nash

Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump says he's 'all for masks' despite reluctance to wear one Trump signs order directing federal government to focus on skills when hiring Trump to return to rally stage in controversial style MORE is pushing the Senate to reauthorize a federal law that gives states funding to train students for different trades and technical careers.

The White House said Trump is meeting with Senate Democrats and Republicans this week to reauthorize and update the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act.

“The important legislation benefits more than 11 million Americans across the country and is integral to the Administration’s working families and workforce development agenda,” deputy White House press secretary Hogan Gidley said in a statement to The Hill.

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“Thanks to the robust economic environment and historically low unemployment rates, there is a record number of unfilled jobs and we are committed to ensuring current and future American workers have access to the high-quality vocational education needed to secure family sustaining careers and thrive in the modern economy.”

The law, which first passed in 2006, provides states with federal grants for career and technical education programs. 

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderGianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Reopening schools seen as vital step in pandemic recovery OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' report | Climate change erases millennia of cooling: study | Senate nixes proposal limiting Energy Department's control on nuclear agency budget MORE (R-Tenn.), who chairs the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee, is in negotiations with panel ranking member Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayLobbying battle brewing over access to COVID-19 vaccine Trump officials seek to reassure public about safety of a potential coronavirus vaccine Overnight Health Care: Trump refuses to say if he slowed down coronavirus testing | US COVID-19 cases rise, marking ugly contrast with Europe | Trump health officials to testify on continued dangers of coronavirus pandemic MORE (D-Wash.) on an updated bill. Sens. Michael Enzi (D-Wyo.) and Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Cure Violence Global founder Gary Slutkin says violence and epidemics follow same patterns; Global death toll surpasses half a million 21 senators urge Pentagon against military use to curb nationwide protests Overnight Health Care: Trump says US 'terminating' relationship with WHO | Cuomo: NYC on track to start reopening week of June 8 | COVID-19 workplace complaints surge MORE Jr. (D-Pa.) are also part of the talks.

At a hearing last month, Alexander said he’s hoping to hold a markup on reauthorization bill on June 20.

“There are many bills we could vote on, on June the 20, if we reach agreement on the language which will take some cooperation and compromise,” he said. “Hopefully we can apply Sen. Enzi’s 80-20 rule — if we can agree on 80 percent of it we can get the other 20 sometime later.”

Bloomberg reported last month that past negotiations hit a stalemate over how much authority the Education secretary should have in overseeing the programs.

The House passed a reauthorization bill, introduced by Reps. Glenn “GT” Thompson (R-Pa.) and Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiMilley confirms soldiers deployed to DC amid unrest were given bayonets Democrats seek information on Treasury's administration of 'opportunity zone' program Biden campaign rips 'outrageous' Trump comments on coronavirus testing MORE (D-Ill.), in June 2017 by a voice vote.

In a statement to The Hill, Murray said she hopes Senate negotiations continue to move forward in a bipartisan way.

“At a time when many families are struggling to find good paying jobs and many companies are struggling to find skilled workers, there is broad, bipartisan support for the Perkins Career and Technical Education Program—so I certainly hope that a small number of Republicans don’t try to turn this into just another partisan fight," she said.

"I am ready to get this done, and I know there are a whole lot of Democrats, Republicans and business groups who join me in hoping that we can do this in a bipartisan way.”

--Updated at 7:07 p.m.