Feinstein on family separations: ‘This is the United States of America. It isn't Nazi Germany’

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight Hillary Clinton: FBI investigation into Kavanaugh could be done quickly Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE (D-Calif.) blasted the Trump administration over family separations late Monday, saying the U.S. is not Nazi Germany. 

"This is the United States of America. It isn't Nazi Germany, and there's a difference. And we don't take children from their parents until now and I think it's such a sad day. People are so upset," Feinstein said on MSNBC's "All In With Chris Hayes."

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The senator went on to praise a recent op-ed by former first lady Laura Bush, which also ripped the policy, calling it cruel. 

"I just read a wonderful letter to the editor by Laura Bush. I can't believe that this is happening in the United States, and the president insists. So we, of course, will do everything we can to pass a bill which would prohibit this," Feinstein said. 

The Trump administration has laid blame on previous administrations, Democrats and Congress for a policy that has resulted in family separations at the southern border. 

“We’re not the ones responsible for creating this problem. We’ve inherited it,” press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at the White House press briefing on Monday. “But we’re actually the first administration stepping up and trying to fix it.” 

“Calling attention to this matter is important. This is a very serious issue that has resulted after years and years of Congress not taking action,” Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenInvestigation into FEMA head referred to prosecutors: report Gowdy requests FEMA administrator’s travel records amid allegations The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE said at the briefing. 

“So I would thank them both for their comments, I would thank them both for their concerns. I share their concerns,” she continued, speaking of the first ladies who have spoken out about the policy. “But Congress is the one that needs to fix this.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE is slated to meet with House Republicans on Tuesday to discuss a GOP bill shielding young immigrants from deportation. 

He doubled down on the immigration policy in a series of tweets on Monday, and also called on Congress to fix the policy. 

"Children are being used by some of the worst criminals on earth as a means to enter our country. Has anyone been looking at the Crime taking place south of the border. It is historic, with some countries the most dangerous places in the world. Not going to happen in the U.S.," the president said.

 

 

"It is the Democrats fault for being weak and ineffective with Boarder [sic] Security and Crime. Tell them to start thinking about the people devastated by Crime coming from illegal immigration. Change the laws!"