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Dem senator to introduce anti-discrimination bill after Supreme Court upholds travel ban

Dem senator to introduce anti-discrimination bill after Supreme Court upholds travel ban
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsFive takeaways from Biden's first budget proposal The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start MORE (D-Del.) said on Tuesday that he will introduce anti-discrimination legislation in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to uphold President TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE's travel ban.

"In the coming weeks, I plan to introduce legislation to make clear that in the United States, we will not tolerate discrimination based on religion or nationality, and I invite everyone who treasures our American values to join me in defending them," Coons said in a statement, adding that despite the Supreme Court ruling, the travel ban doesn't reflect "America's values."

A spokesman for Coons didn't respond to a request for comment about whether the bill will target the administration's travel ban or discrimination more broadly.

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"The President’s travel ban is not only discriminatory and counterproductive; it stands in direct contrast to the principles embedded in our Constitution and our founders’ vision of a nation where all people are free to worship as they choose," Coons said.

The Supreme Court upheld the ban on nationals from five Muslim-majority countries entering the United States in a 5-4 ruling Tuesday.

In a majority opinion authored by Chief Justice John Roberts, the court said the president has broad discretion to suspend the entry of aliens into the United States.

The move sparked immediate backlash from Democrats, who say the travel ban is discriminatory and contrary to the country's values.

"Discriminating against individuals based on their religion or country of origin without evidence that the person poses a national security threat doesn’t make us any safer, and it undermines our core values," said Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Congress looks to rein in Biden's war powers | Diversity chief at Special Operations Command reassigned during probe into social media posts Congress looks to rein in Biden's war powers House panel advances bill to repeal 2002 war authorization MORE (D-Va.), who like Coons is a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. "Congress should pass legislation to revoke this ban."

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Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyPassage of FASTER Act is critical for food allergy community Sunday shows: Biden's border woes, gun control dominate Murphy, Toomey say background check bill could pass Senate MORE (D-Conn.) argued that Congress should pass his legislation to block funding for enforcement of the travel ban.

"The Supreme Court won’t stop that unconscionable policy, but an act of Congress can," he said. "I have a bill that would immediately stop President Trump’s mean-spirited Muslim ban and once again open our doors to children and parents suffering at the hands of our enemies."

But any push to overturn or limit Trump's travel ban through legislation is likely dead on arrival in a Republican-controlled Congress.

Asked about the chances of success for such legislation, Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinLawmakers say fixing border crisis is Biden's job Number of migrants detained at southern border reaches 15-year high: reports Grassley, Cornyn push for Senate border hearing MORE (D-Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, suggested it isn't politically feasible.

"Let's be real," he said. "The Republicans are in control."