Schumer: 'Height of hypocrisy' to vote on Supreme Court nominee this year

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGetting serious about infrastructure Schumer calls on McConnell to hold vote on Equality Act 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE (N.Y.) said Wednesday that it would be the “height of hypocrisy” for Republicans to vote on a nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy before the November midterm elections.

Schumer said that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada Schumer calls on McConnell to hold vote on Equality Act House Dem cites transgender grandson in voting for Equality Act MORE (R-Ky.) should show consistency and respect for his own precedent by delaying Senate confirmation proceedings for Kennedy's successor until 2019, when a new Congress is seated.

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“Millions of people are just months away from determining the senators who should vote to confirm or reject the president’s nominee and their voices deserve to be heard,” Schumer said on the Senate floor.

He said “anything by that would be the absolute height of hypocrisy.”

McConnell announced moments before that he plans for the Senate to vote in the fall on President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE’s next Supreme Court nominee.

McConnell kept the late Justice Antonin Scalia's seat vacant for more than a year after he died in February 2016.

The GOP leader blocked a hearing and vote on Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandWarren calls for Congress to pass federal laws protecting Roe v. Wade Harris 'open' to adding seats to Supreme Court Gillibrand sets litmus test: I will only nominate judges who back Roe v. Wade MORE, President Obama’s nominee at the time, arguing that voters should weigh in during the 2016 presidential election on the ideological balance of the high court.

The move allowed Trump to nominate now-Justice Neil Gorsuch to the court shortly after taking office in 2017.