Schumer unveils bill to decriminalize marijuana

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerHouse Judiciary Dems seek answers over Trump's national emergency declaration Mandatory E-Verify: The other border wall Trump says he 'didn't need to' declare emergency but wanted 'faster' action MORE (D-N.Y.) has introduced legislation to decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.

The Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act removes marijuana from the list of scheduled substances under the 1970 Controlled Substances Act, allowing states to decide how to handle marijuana possession, according to a statement from Schumer’s office.

“The time to decriminalize marijuana is now,” Schumer said.

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The bill, introduced Wednesday, would preserve the federal government’s ability to prevent trafficking from states where it would be legal to states where it is not, the statement said.

The legislation would also invest $500 million over the span of five years to the Department of Health and Human Services for medical marijuana research and understanding the effects of THC.

Under the bill, states would be allowed to seal or expunge individual marijuana possession records.

Schumer said in a statement that the legislation is “simply the right thing to do.”

The bill is co-sponsored by Sens. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Business, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration Poll: Sanders, Biden seen as most popular second choices in Dem primary MORE (I-Vt.), Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall Clinton on GOP promoting Trump 'stronger together' quote: Now copy my policies too MORE (D-Va.) and Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthTrump’s new Syria timetable raises concern among key anti-ISIS allies Bipartisan senators press Trump for strategy to protect Syrian Kurds Haaland displays trans flag outside office after Supreme Court decision on transgender military ban MORE (D-Ill.).

Attorney General Jeff Session told The Hill earlier this month that he hasn’t talked to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates ambassador to Turkey Trump heads to Mar-a-Lago after signing bill to avert shutdown CNN, MSNBC to air ad turned down by Fox over Nazi imagery MORE about legislation to decriminalize marijuana at the federal level but believes the president would support a bill that protected states that do so.