Graham: Red-state Dems 'are going to have a very hard decision' on Supreme Court pick

Graham: Red-state Dems 'are going to have a very hard decision' on Supreme Court pick
© Greg Nash

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump says he'll '100 percent' veto measure blocking emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Dems tee up Tuesday vote against Trump's emergency declaration | GOP expects few defections | Trump doubles number of troops staying in Syria to 400 On The Money: Dems set Tuesday vote on Trump's emergency declaration | Most Republicans expected to back Trump | Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown drama | Powell heading before Congress MORE (R-S.C.) said Sunday that red-state Senate Democrats are going to face a tough decision on whether to confirm President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE's next Supreme Court pick, urging Republicans to "rally behind" the eventual nominee. 

"Red-state Democrats are going to have a very hard decision, and I hope that every Republican will rally behind these picks because they’re all outstanding," Graham said on "Fox News Sunday."

Trump is expected to announce his pick to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy on Monday, putting Senate Democrats who are up for reelection in states Trump won in a delicate position.

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Democrats in those states risk isolating moderate voters who say the Senate should confirm the Supreme Court nominee. But voting to confirm the nominee could hurt their support among the party's base. 

Trump's shortlist for the Supreme Court nomination is thought to include conservative judges Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett and Raymond Kethledge, among others. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Trump selects Kelly Craft for United Nations ambassador Union leader says Green New Deal would make infrastructure bill ‘absolutely impossible’ MORE (R-Ky.) has said he wants to hold a vote on the nominee before the midterm elections in November, while Democratic leaders hope to delay the vote until after the election.

Kennedy, who announced his retirement from the high court late last month, was often seen as a swing vote on the bench. In his more than three decades on the Supreme Court, Kennedy sided with the court's conservatives on issues like religious freedom and with its liberals on abortion and gay rights.