Poll: Americans more divided on Trump Supreme Court pick than any other since 1987

Poll: Americans more divided on Trump Supreme Court pick than any other since 1987
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Brett Kavanaugh, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE's nominee for the Supreme Court, faces the slimmest margin of support since 1987, according to a new survey.

A Gallup poll released Tuesday found that 41 percent of Americans want to see Kavanaugh confirmed to the bench, while 37 percent of respondents want the Senate to reject his nomination. The four-point advantage for Kavanaugh is the lowest for any of the last 10 nominees since 1987 to be recorded by Gallup.

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Former Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork previously had the least amount of support in the poll's history, recording a six-point advantage over those who wanted to see his nomination fail when he was first announced in 1987, which it eventually did.

In particular, Kavanaugh's reputation among independent voters remains poor, with 38 percent of independents supporting his nomination compared to 37 percent who oppose it.

The two previous nominees to the Supreme Court, Justice Neil Gorsuch and Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandDem senator praises Ford opening the door to testifying Budowsky: Kavanaugh and the rights of women Hirono: Dems could keep SCOTUS seat vacant for two years MORE, both enjoyed the support of 44 percent of independent votes upon their initial announcements. No successful Supreme Court nominee has enjoyed less than the support of 43 percent of independents.

The sharpest divide over Kavanaugh's nomination predictably falls along partisan lines. 76 percent of Republicans support his nomination, according to the poll, while 67 percent of Democrats say the Senate should reject his bid.

Gallup's poll contacted 1,296 adults living in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. between July 10-15. The margin of error is +/-3 percentage points.