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Senate to vote on resolution telling Trump not to hand over former diplomats

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFive things to know about Georgia's Senate runoffs Obama chief economist says Democrats should accept smaller coronavirus relief package if necessary Memo to Biden: Go big — use the moment to not only rebuild but to rebuild differently MORE (R-Ky.) scheduled a vote for Thursday afternoon on a Democratic resolution warning Trump against handing over former diplomats.

The Senate will vote on the resolution around 1:45 p.m.

Democratic Sens. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDemocrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff Democratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Trump appointee sparks bipartisan furor for politicizing media agency MORE (N.J.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzTech CEOs clash with lawmakers in contentious hearing Bitter fight over Barrett fuels calls to nix filibuster, expand court Senate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination MORE (D-Hawaii), as well as Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerThe five biggest challenges facing President-elect Biden Collins urges voters to turn out in Georgia runoffs Protect America's houses of worship in year-end appropriations package MORE (D-N.Y.), introduced the resolution warning the administration against agreeing to let the Russian government question former officials.

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"One of the most stunning things about the summit was the president's openness to a request by President Putin to question former United States Ambassador to Moscow Michael McFaul and other Americans," Schumer said earlier Thursday.

"Certainly if the president agreed to such a request, Congress must do everything in its power to block it. There can be no room for debate, no room for discussion. We must be clear and clear quickly," Schumer continued.

The resolution, according to Schumer, would make it "the sense of Congress that the United States should refuse to make available any current or former diplomat, civil servant, political appointee, law enforcement official or member of the Armed Forces of the United States for questioning by the government or Vladimir Putin."

Democrats and some Republicans have blasted the White House for even considering the offer from Russian President Vladimir Putin.

But White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Wednesday that Trump will discuss allowing Russian investigators to come to the United States to question U.S. citizens, including a former American ambassador to Russia.

Putin said during a press conference with Trump on Monday that the Kremlin would permit special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s team to travel to Russia and attend the questioning of 12 Russian intelligence officers indicted in the probe, if Russia is allowed to help interrogate some people “who have something to do with illegal actions in the territory of Russia.”