Senate to vote on resolution telling Trump not to hand over former diplomats

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE (R-Ky.) scheduled a vote for Thursday afternoon on a Democratic resolution warning Trump against handing over former diplomats.

The Senate will vote on the resolution around 1:45 p.m.

Democratic Sens. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDemocrats reject hardball tactics against Senate parliamentarian  Biden threatens more sanctions on Ethiopia, Eritrea over Tigray conflict Failed drug vote points to bigger challenges for Democrats MORE (N.J.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzHotel workers need a lifeline; It's time to pass The Save Hotel Jobs Act Equilibrium/Sustainability — Presented by The American Petroleum Institute — Scientists potty train cows to cut pollution Conservation group says it will only endorse Democrats who support .5T spending plan MORE (D-Hawaii), as well as Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMcConnell signals Senate GOP will oppose combined debt ceiling-funding bill Centrist state lawmaker enters Ohio GOP Senate primary Biden discusses agenda with Schumer, Pelosi ahead of pivotal week MORE (D-N.Y.), introduced the resolution warning the administration against agreeing to let the Russian government question former officials.

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"One of the most stunning things about the summit was the president's openness to a request by President Putin to question former United States Ambassador to Moscow Michael McFaul and other Americans," Schumer said earlier Thursday.

"Certainly if the president agreed to such a request, Congress must do everything in its power to block it. There can be no room for debate, no room for discussion. We must be clear and clear quickly," Schumer continued.

The resolution, according to Schumer, would make it "the sense of Congress that the United States should refuse to make available any current or former diplomat, civil servant, political appointee, law enforcement official or member of the Armed Forces of the United States for questioning by the government or Vladimir Putin."

Democrats and some Republicans have blasted the White House for even considering the offer from Russian President Vladimir Putin.

But White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Wednesday that Trump will discuss allowing Russian investigators to come to the United States to question U.S. citizens, including a former American ambassador to Russia.

Putin said during a press conference with Trump on Monday that the Kremlin would permit special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE’s team to travel to Russia and attend the questioning of 12 Russian intelligence officers indicted in the probe, if Russia is allowed to help interrogate some people “who have something to do with illegal actions in the territory of Russia.”