Ex-ambassador thanks Senate for resolution against Trump handing over officials

Ex-ambassador thanks Senate for resolution against Trump handing over officials
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Former Ambassador Michael McFaul, who represented the U.S. in Russia under the Obama administration, thanked the Senate on Thursday after its members passed a resolution warning President TrumpDonald John TrumpKimberly Guilfoyle reports being asymptomatic and 'feeling really pretty good' after COVID-19 diagnosis Biden says he will rejoin WHO on his first day in office Lincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad MORE against handing former U.S. officials over to foreign countries for questioning.

McFaul tweeted his thanks to the Senate after the resolution, which was spearheaded by Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerA renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Trump may be DACA participants' best hope, but will Democrats play ball? MORE (D-N.Y.), passed on Thursday by a vote of 98-0.

"98-0. Bipartisanship is not dead yet in the US Senate. Thank you all for your support," the former ambassador tweeted.

The resolution passed the Senate just a day after the White House said Wednesday that Trump will discuss allowing Russian investigators to come to the United States to question U.S. citizens, including McFaul, over crimes allegedly committed in Russia.

"One of the most stunning things about the summit was the president's openness to a request by President Putin to question former United States Ambassador to Moscow Michael McFaul and other Americans," Schumer said earlier Thursday.

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"Certainly if the president agreed to such a request, Congress must do everything in its power to block it. There can be no room for debate, no room for discussion. We must be clear and clear quickly," he continued.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert blasted Russia's charges against McFaul as "ridiculous" in a press conference on Wednesday, but declined to comment on whether Trump would allow him to be questioned.

“I can’t answer on behalf of the White House," Nauert said.

“And I believe some of that would fall under the Department of Justice, so I’d have to loop in the Department of Justice on this. This is something that just came out,” she added.