Booker: Those who don't oppose Kavanaugh are 'complicit in the evil'

Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerDespite Senate setbacks, the fight for voting rights is far from over Small ranchers say Biden letting them get squeezed Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans MORE (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that senators who don’t oppose President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver dead at 77 Biden, Democrats losing ground with independent and suburban voters: poll Bipartisan Senate group discusses changes to election law MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are “complicit in the evil.”

Booker, speaking at a press conference with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenArizona Democratic Party executive board censures Sinema Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Biden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service MORE (D-Mass.) and religious and moral leaders, said that Kavanaugh’s nomination “has nothing to do with politics” but with “who we are as moral beings.”

“I’m here to call on folks to understand that in a moral moment, there is no neutral. In a moral moment, there is no bystanders,” he said. “You are either complicit in the evil, you are either contributing to the wrong, or you are fighting against it.”

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Booker called on senators to reject Kavanaugh, saying that his “ancestors said if someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“He has shown us who he is,” he added.

Warren similarly urged senators to reject Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“It is not enough to have a good heart … we are called to act,” Warren said. ”We are on the moral side of history.”

Both Democratic senators had previously promised to oppose Kavanaugh when Trump tapped him for the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulConservative pundit says YouTube blocked interview with Rand Paul These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 I'm furious about Democrats taking the blame — it's time to fight back MORE (R-Ky.) said in an interview published Monday that he is "undecided" on whether he will support the Supreme Court pick, citing Kavanaugh's past rulings on Fourth Amendment rights.

Senate Republicans are planning to hold the vote on Kavanaugh's nomination ahead of the 2018 midterms: The GOP currently holds the Senate 51-49, leaving whether or not the nomination passes up to Republicans and red-state Democrats.