Booker: Those who don't oppose Kavanaugh are 'complicit in the evil'

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker fundraises off Biden announcement The symbol of 'Wakanda' and black political vision The Hill's Morning Report - Trump tells House investigators 'no' MORE (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that senators who don’t oppose President TrumpDonald John TrumpForget the spin: Five unrefuted Mueller Report revelations Lara Trump: Merkel admitting migrants 'one of the worst things that ever happened to Germany' Financial satisfaction hits record high: survey MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are “complicit in the evil.”

Booker, speaking at a press conference with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenColbert links large 2020 Dem field to Avengers: 'A group of every available person in the universe' Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary Sanders dominates, Buttigieg surges in 2020 social media battle MORE (D-Mass.) and religious and moral leaders, said that Kavanaugh’s nomination “has nothing to do with politics” but with “who we are as moral beings.”

“I’m here to call on folks to understand that in a moral moment, there is no neutral. In a moral moment, there is no bystanders,” he said. “You are either complicit in the evil, you are either contributing to the wrong, or you are fighting against it.”

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Booker called on senators to reject Kavanaugh, saying that his “ancestors said if someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“He has shown us who he is,” he added.

Warren similarly urged senators to reject Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“It is not enough to have a good heart … we are called to act,” Warren said. ”We are on the moral side of history.”

Both Democratic senators had previously promised to oppose Kavanaugh when Trump tapped him for the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem super PAC campaign urges Republicans to back impeachment Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes Trump vetoes measure ending US support for Saudi-led war in Yemen MORE (R-Ky.) said in an interview published Monday that he is "undecided" on whether he will support the Supreme Court pick, citing Kavanaugh's past rulings on Fourth Amendment rights.

Senate Republicans are planning to hold the vote on Kavanaugh's nomination ahead of the 2018 midterms: The GOP currently holds the Senate 51-49, leaving whether or not the nomination passes up to Republicans and red-state Democrats.