Booker: Those who don't oppose Kavanaugh are 'complicit in the evil'

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBiden team discussed 2020 run with O'Rourke as VP: report Pollster says likely Dem 2020 nominee has not emerged in national conversation yet O'Rourke doubles support in CNN poll of Dem presidential race MORE (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that senators who don’t oppose President TrumpDonald John TrumpAustralia recognizes West Jerusalem as Israeli capital, won't move embassy Mulvaney will stay on as White House budget chief Trump touts ruling against ObamaCare: ‘Mitch and Nancy’ should pass new health-care law MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are “complicit in the evil.”

Booker, speaking at a press conference with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden team discussed 2020 run with O'Rourke as VP: report Warren talks identity in address to historically black university: 'I'm not a person of color' O'Rourke doubles support in CNN poll of Dem presidential race MORE (D-Mass.) and religious and moral leaders, said that Kavanaugh’s nomination “has nothing to do with politics” but with “who we are as moral beings.”

“I’m here to call on folks to understand that in a moral moment, there is no neutral. In a moral moment, there is no bystanders,” he said. “You are either complicit in the evil, you are either contributing to the wrong, or you are fighting against it.”

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Booker called on senators to reject Kavanaugh, saying that his “ancestors said if someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“He has shown us who he is,” he added.

Warren similarly urged senators to reject Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“It is not enough to have a good heart … we are called to act,” Warren said. ”We are on the moral side of history.”

Both Democratic senators had previously promised to oppose Kavanaugh when Trump tapped him for the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Senate bucks Trump with Yemen war vote, resolution calling crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi killing | House briefing on Saudi Arabia fails to move needle | Inhofe casts doubt on Space Force Lame-duck Congress should pass First Step Act Limited Senate access to CIA intelligence is not conspiracy MORE (R-Ky.) said in an interview published Monday that he is "undecided" on whether he will support the Supreme Court pick, citing Kavanaugh's past rulings on Fourth Amendment rights.

Senate Republicans are planning to hold the vote on Kavanaugh's nomination ahead of the 2018 midterms: The GOP currently holds the Senate 51-49, leaving whether or not the nomination passes up to Republicans and red-state Democrats.