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Booker: Those who don't oppose Kavanaugh are 'complicit in the evil'

Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official Booker brings girlfriend, actress Rosario Dawson, to inauguration Officials brace for second Trump impeachment trial MORE (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that senators who don’t oppose President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are “complicit in the evil.”

Booker, speaking at a press conference with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBudowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated Top Senate Democrat backs waiver for Biden Pentagon nominee Consumer bureau director resigns after Biden's inauguration MORE (D-Mass.) and religious and moral leaders, said that Kavanaugh’s nomination “has nothing to do with politics” but with “who we are as moral beings.”

“I’m here to call on folks to understand that in a moral moment, there is no neutral. In a moral moment, there is no bystanders,” he said. “You are either complicit in the evil, you are either contributing to the wrong, or you are fighting against it.”

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Booker called on senators to reject Kavanaugh, saying that his “ancestors said if someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“He has shown us who he is,” he added.

Warren similarly urged senators to reject Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“It is not enough to have a good heart … we are called to act,” Warren said. ”We are on the moral side of history.”

Both Democratic senators had previously promised to oppose Kavanaugh when Trump tapped him for the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official McConnell faces conservative backlash over Trump criticism McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time MORE (R-Ky.) said in an interview published Monday that he is "undecided" on whether he will support the Supreme Court pick, citing Kavanaugh's past rulings on Fourth Amendment rights.

Senate Republicans are planning to hold the vote on Kavanaugh's nomination ahead of the 2018 midterms: The GOP currently holds the Senate 51-49, leaving whether or not the nomination passes up to Republicans and red-state Democrats.