Booker: Those who don't oppose Kavanaugh are 'complicit in the evil'

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerStakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Booker introduces bill to create 'DemocracyCorps' for elections MORE (D-N.J.) said Tuesday that senators who don’t oppose President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump anti-reg push likely to end up in court Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh are “complicit in the evil.”

Booker, speaking at a press conference with Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPentagon charts its own course on COVID-19, risking Trump's ire Warren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (D-Mass.) and religious and moral leaders, said that Kavanaugh’s nomination “has nothing to do with politics” but with “who we are as moral beings.”

“I’m here to call on folks to understand that in a moral moment, there is no neutral. In a moral moment, there is no bystanders,” he said. “You are either complicit in the evil, you are either contributing to the wrong, or you are fighting against it.”

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Booker called on senators to reject Kavanaugh, saying that his “ancestors said if someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“He has shown us who he is,” he added.

Warren similarly urged senators to reject Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“It is not enough to have a good heart … we are called to act,” Warren said. ”We are on the moral side of history.”

Both Democratic senators had previously promised to oppose Kavanaugh when Trump tapped him for the Supreme Court vacancy created by Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Congress headed toward unemployment showdown Doctors push Trump to quickly reopen country in letter organized by conservatives MORE (R-Ky.) said in an interview published Monday that he is "undecided" on whether he will support the Supreme Court pick, citing Kavanaugh's past rulings on Fourth Amendment rights.

Senate Republicans are planning to hold the vote on Kavanaugh's nomination ahead of the 2018 midterms: The GOP currently holds the Senate 51-49, leaving whether or not the nomination passes up to Republicans and red-state Democrats.