Franken: I miss being a senator, haven't ruled out running for office again

Franken: I miss being a senator, haven't ruled out running for office again
© Camille Fine

Former Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGillibrand seizes on abortion debate to jump-start campaign Study finds misconduct is the top reason CEOs are leaving large companies Hirono electrifies left as Trump antagonist MORE (D) said in an interview that he misses his former job and that he is considering a return to public service.

Franken told CBS affiliate WCCO that it was "very gratifying" to receive a warm public response at his first event since leaving office, a school dedication on tribal lands in Minnesota.

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“That means a lot to me. It was very moving for me. It was very gratifying. I put my heart in the job,” Franken told the news channel. “I miss the whole job. I loved that job, I loved the job as senator."

"It was very meaningful for me and bittersweet, I would like to still be there," he added.

Asked by a reporter whether the event marked a return to public life and a possible future run for office, Franken said only that he had not decided.

“Well, see, if I say anything there you will put it in the story. I don’t know. I haven’t ruled it out, and I haven’t ruled it in," the former senator said.

WCCO reported that Franken received repeated standing ovations through his speech at the school, after having helped secure $12 million in funding for the new facility as senator. Franken was also greeted warmly by those in attendance, the news channel reported.

Franken left office in December after allegations of sexual misconduct were leveled against the Minnesota Democrat by eight women.

The former "Saturday Night Live" comedian resigned in a defiant speech on the Senate floor condemning a political system that forced him to resign over the allegations but allowed President TrumpDonald John TrumpA better VA, with mental health services, is essential for America's veterans Pelosi, Nadler tangle on impeachment, contempt vote Trump arrives in Japan to kick off 4-day state visit MORE, who is accused of similar acts, to win the 2016 presidential election.

"I of all people am aware that there is some irony in the fact that I am leaving, while a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office and a man who has repeatedly preyed on young girls campaigns for the Senate with the full support of his party," Franken said in December.