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Planned Parenthood launches six-figure Supreme Court ad campaign

Planned Parenthood launches six-figure Supreme Court ad campaign
© Greg Nash

Planned Parenthood Action Fund is launching a six-figure ad campaign as part of a broader effort by progressive groups to highlight personal stories of individuals who could be impacted if President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Guardian slams Trump over comments about assault on reporter Five takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Watchdog org: Tillerson used million in taxpayer funds to fly throughout US MORE's nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, is confirmed to the Supreme Court.

The buy, announced Wednesday, includes TV ads in Maine and Alaska, the home states of two potential GOP swing votes: Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns Susan Collins and the mob mentality Graham: I hope Dems 'get their ass kicked' for conduct around Kavanaugh MORE and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiEx-Florida lawmaker leaves Republican Party Murkowski not worried about a Palin challenge Flake on Kavanaugh confirmation: To see GOP 'spiking the ball in the end zone' doesn't seem right MORE. It also includes a nationwide digital ad.

"We cannot take any state for granted and we're not going to, so we will be running those ads all across the country," said Carmen Berkley, the managing director of Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

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The ads will include "patient voices," including two women who had an abortion before the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized the procedure.

The Planned Parenthood Action Fund ads come as a coalition of outside groups is stepping up efforts to block Kavanaugh, who, if confirmed, is expected to shape the political leaning of the Supreme Court for decades.

The groups launched the #DearSenators campaign on Wednesday to focus on Kavanaugh's impact on health care and access to abortion.

"What we're hearing is that when most Americans talk about what is at stake at this fight they're not thinking about a political showdown in Washington, D.C. They're thinking about their family. ... What our senators do next will impact real people in every corner of this country," said Sean Eldridge, the president of Stand Up America.

In addition to Planned Parenthood Action Fund and Stand Up America, Advocates for Youth, Center for American Progress and National Women’s Law Center are taking part in the campaign to shift the conversation around Kavanaugh from political to personal.

The groups are launching a website as part of their campaign that will include recordings of individuals' stories, as well as a way for supporters to send senators a voicemail to describe how Kavanaugh's confirmation would impact them or details for sending a letter.

The new campaign comes as outside groups are trying to increase pressure on potential Kavanaugh swing votes as senators are back in their home states for a truncated two-week August recess.

Democrats can't block Kavanaugh on their own after Republicans nixed the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominations last year.

Republicans hold a 51-seat majority in the Senate. If Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMcConnell: GOP could try to repeal ObamaCare again after midterms Comey donates maximum amount to Democratic challenger in Virginia House race Live coverage: McSally clashes with Sinema in Arizona Senate debate MORE (R-Ariz.), who is battling brain cancer, doesn't return for the Kavanaugh vote, Democrats will need to win over at least one GOP senator. If he returns, and votes "yes," they would need to win over two.

With Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSaudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Noisy democracy, or rude people behaving like children? Lawmakers, Wall Street shrug off Trump's escalating Fed attacks MORE (R-Ky.) already announcing his support for Kavanaugh, Collins and Murkowski are viewed as the most likely potential GOP swing votes.

Democrats would also need to keep their entire 49-member caucus united, even as several vulnerable incumbents run for reelection in states won by Trump. Three Democratic senators — Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyDonnelly parodies 'Veep' in new campaign ad Election Countdown: Florida Senate fight resumes after hurricane | Cruz softens ObamaCare attacks | GOP worries Trump will lose suburban women | Latest Senate polls | Rep. Dave Brat gets Trump's 'total endorsement' | Dem candidates raise record B Poll: Dems lead in Indiana, West Virginia Senate races, tied in Nevada MORE (Ind.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinElection Countdown: Florida Senate fight resumes after hurricane | Cruz softens ObamaCare attacks | GOP worries Trump will lose suburban women | Latest Senate polls | Rep. Dave Brat gets Trump's 'total endorsement' | Dem candidates raise record B Poll: Dems lead in Indiana, West Virginia Senate races, tied in Nevada McConnell defends Trump-backed lawsuit against ObamaCare MORE (W.Va.) and Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampFive takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Live coverage: Heitkamp faces Cramer in high-stakes North Dakota debate Sexual assault survivor named in Heitkamp ad: 'She definitely lost my vote' MORE (N.D.) — voted for Trump's first Supreme Court nominee, Justice Neil Gorsuch.

But Democrats are hoping that if they can rally the public in opposition to Kavanaugh that will sway at least one GOP senator to vote "no," as well as keep their own caucus in line.