Paul seeks to cut off Planned Parenthood funds via massive spending bill

Paul seeks to cut off Planned Parenthood funds via massive spending bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulFive things to watch in two Ohio special election primaries Up next in the culture wars: Adding women to the draft The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (R-Ky.) wants to tie a fight over funding for Planned Parenthood to a massive government spending bill currently being debated by the Senate.

Paul has filed an amendment that would prevent federal funding from going to the organization and others that perform abortions. 

"This is our chance to turn our words into action, stand up for the sanctity of life, and speak out for the most innocent among us that have no voice," Paul said in a statement.

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The Kentucky Republican added that preventing taxpayer dollars from going to abortion providers should be "one of the top priorities" for the GOP-controlled Congress. 

Paul wants to attach his proposal to a massive Defense, Health and Human Services (HHS), Labor and Education funding bill that is currently being debated on the Senate floor.

Despite Republicans having control of the White House and both houses of Congress, they've been unable to cut off federal funding for Planned Parenthood. 

House Republicans included a provision stripping federal funding for the organization in the HHS bill that cleared the Appropriations Committee.

But Paul could struggle to get a vote on his amendment to the Senate bill. 

Leadership has agreed to avoid attaching so-called poison pill proposals to their legislation. 

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyGraham's COVID-19 'breakthrough' case jolts Senate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden sets new vaccine mandate as COVID-19 cases surge Senate passes .1 billion Capitol security bill MORE (R-Ala.) warned on Monday night that while some senators might support removing the funding including such a provision would become a "spoiler" to the larger government spending bill.