Paul seeks to cut off Planned Parenthood funds via massive spending bill

Paul seeks to cut off Planned Parenthood funds via massive spending bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate approves 4B spending bill Some employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says Dems inflated Puerto Rico death toll | House cancels Friday votes | Florence starts to hit coast MORE (R-Ky.) wants to tie a fight over funding for Planned Parenthood to a massive government spending bill currently being debated by the Senate.

Paul has filed an amendment that would prevent federal funding from going to the organization and others that perform abortions. 

"This is our chance to turn our words into action, stand up for the sanctity of life, and speak out for the most innocent among us that have no voice," Paul said in a statement.

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The Kentucky Republican added that preventing taxpayer dollars from going to abortion providers should be "one of the top priorities" for the GOP-controlled Congress. 

Paul wants to attach his proposal to a massive Defense, Health and Human Services (HHS), Labor and Education funding bill that is currently being debated on the Senate floor.

Despite Republicans having control of the White House and both houses of Congress, they've been unable to cut off federal funding for Planned Parenthood. 

House Republicans included a provision stripping federal funding for the organization in the HHS bill that cleared the Appropriations Committee.

But Paul could struggle to get a vote on his amendment to the Senate bill. 

Leadership has agreed to avoid attaching so-called poison pill proposals to their legislation. 

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyCongress reaches deal to fund government through Dec. 7, preventing shutdown Senate approves first 2019 spending package GOP shrugs off Trump shutdown threat MORE (R-Ala.) warned on Monday night that while some senators might support removing the funding including such a provision would become a "spoiler" to the larger government spending bill.