McConnell suggests Russian sanctions action unlikely in September

McConnell suggests Russian sanctions action unlikely in September
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSanders hits Feinstein over Kavanaugh allegations: Now it’s clear why she did nothing for months On The Money: Senate approves 4B spending bill | China imposes new tariffs on billion in US goods | Ross downplays new tariffs: 'Nobody's going to actually notice' McConnell tamps down any talk of Kavanaugh withdrawal MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday said he favors placing additional sanctions on Russia amid evidence that Russian agents are trying to influence the 2018 midterm elections and hack conservative think tanks, but warned that there are other items on the agenda before a vote on Russia sanctions could occur. 

McConnell suggested Congress could take action in October, weeks before Election Day, saying the September schedule is filling up with plans to vote on spending bills, opioid legislation and a final version of the farm bill.

“September is pretty crowded already. I'm personally very interested in a Russia sanctions bill. I hope there can be a bipartisan coming together with something we can pass,” McConnell told reporters.

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McConnell warned that, given the packed schedule, the vote would likely be pushed to October or even after the election.

“The chances of sandwiching that in, honestly, in the month of September with all the other items that we have squirreling around is probably pretty slim but we’ll be here longer this year,” he said. “It would be high on the list for consideration for floor time.”

Two leading contenders for floor action are a bill sponsored by Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio unloads on Turkish chef for 'feasting' Venezuela's Maduro: 'I got pissed' For Poland, a time for justice Judiciary Democrat calls for additional witnesses to testify on Kavanaugh MORE (R-Fla.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOvernight Defense: Details on defense spending bill | NATO chief dismisses talk of renaming HQ for McCain | North Korea warns US over cyber allegations Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law Trump authorizes sanctions against foreign governments that interfere in US elections MORE (D-Md.) in the Senate Banking Committee and a measure backed by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Graham knocks South Korea over summit with North MORE (R-S.C.) and Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezDems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press Booming economy has Trump taking a well-deserved victory lap MORE (D-N.J.) in the Foreign Relations Committee.

The Rubio-Van Hollen bill, known as the DETER Act, would place sanctions on any foreign government that attempts to interfere in a U.S. election.

If the director of national intelligence finds that the Kremlin has meddled in a federal election, the DETER Act would impose sanctions on Russian finance, energy, defense and mining interests.

Menendez, however, argues that Russia has already interfered in the 2018 election and should face sanctions regardless of additional findings.

The Graham-Menendez bill would increase sanctions on Russian energy and financial sectors, on Russian oligarchs and on Russian sovereign debt.

Van Hollen argued during an appearance on C-SPAN’s “Newsmakers” Friday that further sanctions should be contingent on future violations to be most effective.  

“All the evidence I’ve heard and testimony I’ve heard from experts on sanctions is if you want to deter behavior, what you do is set up a punishment that will happen if someone engages in that behavior,” he said. “Punishing somebody after the fact is like putting toothpaste back into the tube.”