McCain’s death marks decline of Trump’s GOP Senate critics

McCain’s death marks decline of Trump’s GOP Senate critics

Senate Republicans willing to counter President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE on defense and national security are becoming a rarity on Capitol Hill.

The death of Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority Pence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid MORE (R-Ariz.) marks the start of the waning of an already small group of GOP senators willing to act as a counterweight to Trump as the president breaks with decades-long Republican policies.

McCain, despite being diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer in July 2017, remained a vocal critic of U.S. foreign policy and national security under the Trump administration with his outspoken opposition to Gina Haspel's nomination to lead the CIA and his support of tougher sanctions against Russia. 

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The former senator didn’t mention Trump in his farewell statement released Monday, but he appeared to take a parting shot at the ideological differences that have decided the two men for years.

"We weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners of the globe,” McCain said in a statement released by his Senate office. “We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals, rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been.”

His death raises fresh questions about who among the Senate Republican Conference will be willing to criticize the administration on foreign affairs, particularly as so many GOP senators have been wary of a direct confrontation with Trump.

Asked about who could fill the void, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerSasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger RNC votes to give Trump 'undivided support' ahead of 2020 Sen. Risch has unique chance to guide Trump on foreign policy MORE (R-Tenn.) said, “I don’t know, we’ll see.”

“Maybe I’m just being hopeful but maybe after the midterms things will change,” said Corker, who’s retiring in early January.

Pressed on why he thought that November's midterm elections might bring about change, he added, “I don’t know, but I hope it’s going to happen.”

There are few obvious picks for who could fill the gap being left by McCain.

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general GOP wants to pit Ocasio-Cortez against Democrats in the Senate MORE (D-W.Va.) praised McCain on Monday and signaled that he hoped Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCongress closer to forcing Trump’s hand on Saudi support Democrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Warren: Officials have duty ‘to invoke 25th amendment’ if they think Trump is unfit MORE (R-S.C.) and others would step forward. Though Graham was a close friend and ally of McCain, he’s also aligned himself closely with the president on issues like Trump possibly firing Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports McCabe: Trump's 'relentless attack' on FBI prompted memoir Trump: 'Disgraced' McCabe, Rosenstein look like they were planning 'very illegal act' MORE.

“I’m hoping that Lindsey and some other people on the Republican side will step up and meet us in the middle,” Manchin told a West Virginia radio station on Monday.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Trump praises law enforcement response to shooting at Illinois business Five dead in shooting at manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois MORE (D-Ill.) told CBS’s “Face the Nation” that there wasn’t one senator who would be an obvious pick to fill the void created by McCain’s absence.

“Each and every one of us have to play that role in his memory,” he said. “I'm not sure there's one person that is going to grab the banner and move forward.”

Corker initially suggested that GOP Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWhite House, GOP defend Trump emergency declaration GOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority GOP senator voices concern about Trump order, hasn't decided whether he'll back it MORE (Wis.), the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, could emerge as a check on Trump’s foreign policy. He later later told reporters that he would try to think of who could fill the space.

Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsTrump got in Dem’s face over abortion at private meeting: report Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Actor Chris Evans meets with Democratic senators before State of the Union MORE (D-Del.) over the weekend said there were five Republicans who he could potentially see stepping up: Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio in Colombia to push for delivery of humanitarian aid to Venezuela On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (Fla.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungIndiana gets first national park Ivanka Trump to meet with GOP senators to discuss paid family leave legislation Trade official warns senators of obstacles to quick China deal MORE (Ind.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerBipartisan Senators reintroduce legislation to slap new sanctions on Russia Dems seeking path to Senate majority zero-in on Sun Belt Lawmakers eager for 5G breakthrough MORE (Colo.), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Push for cosponsors for new 'Medicare for all' bill | Court lets Dems defend ObamaCare | Flu season not as severe as last year, CDC says Senate approves border bill that prevents shutdown The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers scramble as shutdown deadline nears MORE (Neb.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisDems ready aggressive response to Trump emergency order, as GOP splinters Business, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration GOP senator dedicates heart photo to wife from Senate floor for Valentine's Day MORE (N.C.).

Coons, in an interview with The Washington Post, didn't explain his thinking for each of the five. But Rubio, who ran for president in 2016, has been outspoken about Trump's deal with Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE; Gardner and Young are members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Tillis co-sponsored legislation protecting special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE; and Sasse often sounds off in frank terms against the administration.

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffWhite House, GOP defend Trump emergency declaration Schiff: Evidence of collusion between Trump campaign, Russia 'pretty compelling' Schiff: 'Hard to imagine a poorer case' than Trump's on emergency declaration MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, also compared Sasse to McCain, noting that he used a Senate floor speech to knock his GOP colleagues for opening the door to Sessions being fired.

"You had two prominent GOP senators say, well, if he wants to get rid of the A.G., we'll help him get a new one, but let's wait until after the midterms,” Schiff said on CNN. “I was proud to see Ben Sasse take issue with that. That was very John McCain–like. We need people like John McCain now more than ever."

But Sasse has come under criticism from both Republicans and Democrats for being seen as unwilling to push back against the administration beyond a tweet or a statement. Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin questioned how many times Sasse would "tweet something provocative and then do absolutely nothing to challenge the administration."

The dearth of Trump critics within the Senate Republican Conference isn’t expected to reverse course.

Corker would be a leading contender if he wasn’t retiring, and Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Ariz.), a fellow critic of Trump, is also leaving the Senate in January.

Flake told reporters on Monday that he was concerned it would be harder to find Republicans to push back on Trump’s foreign policy, and he used a Senate floor speech to urge his colleagues to mirror McCain.

“We have lately wasted a lot of words in this town doing and being everything that John McCain was not,” Flake said on the Senate floor. “We would do well to allow this moment to affect us in ways reflected not merely in our words, but in our deeds.” 

McCain, Corker and Flake represented the three GOP senators most willing to publicly call out Trump for his rhetoric, especially his warm tone toward Russian President Vladimir Putin and his questioning of decades-old alliances like NATO.

The death of McCain and retirement of Corker, in particular, could represent a seismic shift in how willing congressional Republicans are to act as a check on the Trump White House. McCain served as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) will now become chairman of the committee, after being acting chairman in McCain’s absence during much of the past year. Meanwhile, Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischOvernight Defense: Trump to sign funding deal, declare national emergency | Shanahan says allies will be consulted on Afghanistan | Dem demands Khashoggi documents Senate approves Syria, anti-BDS bill Trump administration to suspend nuclear treaty with Russia MORE (R-Idaho) is expected to succeed Corker atop the Senate Foreign Relations Committee next year.

Both Inhofe and Risch are considered to be more closely aligned with Trump than McCain or Corker, and less likely to use the megaphone their committee perches provide to criticize or attempt to rein in the White House.

Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Poll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (Texas) downplayed the likelihood that there will be a lack of Republicans willing to criticize Trump.

“I think senators feel completely free to disagree with the president on policy matters as they come up,” he said. “I don’t expect that to change.”

But Democrats, as well as some Republicans, are urging their colleagues to try to emulate McCain’s willingness to work across the aisle on controversial issues, even when they bucked his own party.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Congress must step up to protect Medicare home health care MORE (R-Maine), a moderate senator who often breaks with her party on health care, praised McCain as being “very brave” for getting into the middle of controversial policy fights.

“If his death could cause us all to reflect on the way the Senate used to be and try to honor his legacy by not trying to constantly score partisan political points but rather work together for the good of the country, I can think of no finer legacy for John McCain,” she told a Maine radio station.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats National emergency declaration — a legal fight Trump is likely to win House Judiciary Dems seek answers over Trump's national emergency declaration MORE (D-N.Y.) read part of McCain’s farwell statement from the Senate floor and praised him as being able to transcend partisan battle lines.

“We can honor him by trying to carry out the principles he lived by. We can try, as he did, to put country before party. We can try, as he always did, to speak truth to power,” Schumer said. “And we can try … to restore the Senate to its rightful place in our national political life.”