McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general

McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers run into major speed bumps on spending bills Budowsky: Donald, Boris, Bibi — The right in retreat Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet MORE (R-Ky.) is throwing his support behind Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Democrats bicker over strategy on impeachment McCabe says he would 'absolutely not' cut a deal with prosecutors MORE as some Republicans have opened the door to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump conversation with foreign leader part of complaint that led to standoff between intel chief, Congress: report Pelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Trump to withdraw FEMA chief nominee: report MORE firing the top Justice Department official.

"Yes, I have total confidence in the attorney general; I think he ought to stay exactly where he is," McConnell told reporters on Tuesday, asked if he still supported the attorney general.

McConnell's comments backing Sessions — who served in the Senate for 20 years — mark the first time the Senate GOP leader has publicly weighed in since Trump restarted his feud with the attorney general late last week.

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Speculation about Sessions's job security reached a fever pitch after GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan Overnight Defense: Trump says he has 'many options' on Iran | Hostage negotiator chosen for national security adviser | Senate Dems block funding bill | Documents show Pentagon spent at least 4K at Trump's Scotland resort GOP's Kennedy sends warning shot to Trump nominee Menashi MORE (S.C.) told reporters that it was likely Trump would pick a new attorney general after the midterms. 

Graham, despite widespread pushback from his colleagues, has doubled down on his comments, arguing that the Trump-Sessions relationship is "beyond repair."

"You have to replace him with somebody who is highly qualified and will commit to the Senate to allow Mueller to do his job. ... The President has lost confidence in Jeff Sessions," Graham told NBC News's "Today" on Tuesday.

He added that the two men have a "dysfunctional relationship" and "we need a better one."

But several Republican senators have publicly warned Trump against firing Sessions, suggesting he would not be able to get a successor confirmed through the Senate.

Five Republican senators had breakfast with Sessions on Thursday and encouraged him to stay on the job. Hours after the meeting, which was first reported on Tuesday by The Wall Street Journal, Sessions fired back at the president in a rare statement, saying his department “will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.”

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet Trump administration floats background check proposal to Senate GOP MORE (Texas), the No. 2 Senate Republican, called the breakfast a "standard" meeting similar to what he and other Judiciary Committee members have had with other attorney generals.

"It kind of turned to the kerfuffle with the president and we all encouraged him to stay strong," Cornyn told reporters when asked about the meeting.

Sessions invited the GOP senators to the meeting, which was scheduled before the current round of "unpleasantness," according to Cornyn. In addition to Cornyn, GOP Sens. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseManufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank The Hill's Morning Report - Trump ousts Bolton; GOP exhales after win in NC Trump endorses Sasse in 2020 race MORE (Neb.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranPompeo pressed on possible Senate run by Kansas media Jerry Moran: 'I wouldn't be surprised' if Pompeo ran for Senate in Kansas Senators introduce bill aimed at protecting Olympic athletes in response to abuse scandals MORE (Kan.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis trails Democratic Senate challenger by 2 points: poll Kavanaugh impeachment push hits Capitol buzz saw The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation MORE (N.C.) attended the breakfast.

Cornyn added that senators encouraged Sessions to "stay strong," while acknowledging that Trump's attacks "can't be fun." Asked if Sessions indicated that he would take their advice, Cornyn pointed to the statement released by Sessions.

"You saw the statement that came out of his office," he said, "and I think part of that started at the breakfast. That's the way I interpreted it. It sounded to me like he was laying down a pretty firm marker."

Trump renewed his criticism of Sessions — who was his earliest Senate supporter but has fallen from grace amid the Russia probe — during a Fox News interview last week over the attorney general's recusal from matters related to the special counsel investigation into Russia's election interference.

Trump has only doubled down on his criticism after Sessions said he wouldn't be improperly influenced.Trump said in a tweet that Sessions should look at the "other side."

"Come on Jeff, you can do it, the country is waiting!" Trump said.