McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general

McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKey GOP senators appear cool to Kavanaugh accuser's demand Trump hints at new executive action on immigration, wants filibuster-proof Senate majority The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump MORE (R-Ky.) is throwing his support behind Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHillicon Valley: Trump cyber strategy lets US go on offense | AT&T urges court to let Time Warner merger stand | Conservatives want wife of DOJ official to testify | Facebook, nonprofits team up to fight fake news | DC camera hacker pleads guilty Vote Democrat in midterms to rein in Trump, preserve justice Sessions limits ability of judges to dismiss deportation cases MORE as some Republicans have opened the door to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE firing the top Justice Department official.

"Yes, I have total confidence in the attorney general; I think he ought to stay exactly where he is," McConnell told reporters on Tuesday, asked if he still supported the attorney general.

McConnell's comments backing Sessions — who served in the Senate for 20 years — mark the first time the Senate GOP leader has publicly weighed in since Trump restarted his feud with the attorney general late last week.

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Speculation about Sessions's job security reached a fever pitch after GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamKim, Moon toss ball to Trump in ‘last, best chance’ for Korean peace GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Collins: Kavanaugh accuser should 'reconsider,' testify on Monday MORE (S.C.) told reporters that it was likely Trump would pick a new attorney general after the midterms. 

Graham, despite widespread pushback from his colleagues, has doubled down on his comments, arguing that the Trump-Sessions relationship is "beyond repair."

"You have to replace him with somebody who is highly qualified and will commit to the Senate to allow Mueller to do his job. ... The President has lost confidence in Jeff Sessions," Graham told NBC News's "Today" on Tuesday.

He added that the two men have a "dysfunctional relationship" and "we need a better one."

But several Republican senators have publicly warned Trump against firing Sessions, suggesting he would not be able to get a successor confirmed through the Senate.

Five Republican senators had breakfast with Sessions on Thursday and encouraged him to stay on the job. Hours after the meeting, which was first reported on Tuesday by The Wall Street Journal, Sessions fired back at the president in a rare statement, saying his department “will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.”

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynKey GOP senators appear cool to Kavanaugh accuser's demand Trump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle GOP mulls having outside counsel question Kavanaugh, Ford MORE (Texas), the No. 2 Senate Republican, called the breakfast a "standard" meeting similar to what he and other Judiciary Committee members have had with other attorney generals.

"It kind of turned to the kerfuffle with the president and we all encouraged him to stay strong," Cornyn told reporters when asked about the meeting.

Sessions invited the GOP senators to the meeting, which was scheduled before the current round of "unpleasantness," according to Cornyn. In addition to Cornyn, GOP Sens. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseMcConnell tamps down any talk of Kavanaugh withdrawal Senate approves 4B spending bill Grassley agrees to second Kavanaugh hearing after GOP members revolt MORE (Neb.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGoogle says it continues to allow apps to access Gmail user data McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general Tougher Russia sanctions face skepticism from Senate Republicans MORE (Kan.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTrump assures storm victims in Carolinas: 'We will be there 100 percent' North Carolina governor: We saw ‘significant damage’ in eastern part of state GOP senator on allegation against Kavanaugh: 'Why on Earth' wasn't it discussed earlier? MORE (N.C.) attended the breakfast.

Cornyn added that senators encouraged Sessions to "stay strong," while acknowledging that Trump's attacks "can't be fun." Asked if Sessions indicated that he would take their advice, Cornyn pointed to the statement released by Sessions.

"You saw the statement that came out of his office," he said, "and I think part of that started at the breakfast. That's the way I interpreted it. It sounded to me like he was laying down a pretty firm marker."

Trump renewed his criticism of Sessions — who was his earliest Senate supporter but has fallen from grace amid the Russia probe — during a Fox News interview last week over the attorney general's recusal from matters related to the special counsel investigation into Russia's election interference.

Trump has only doubled down on his criticism after Sessions said he wouldn't be improperly influenced.Trump said in a tweet that Sessions should look at the "other side."

"Come on Jeff, you can do it, the country is waiting!" Trump said.