Warren: If Democrats take Senate, they'll vote on marijuana bill

Warren: If Democrats take Senate, they'll vote on marijuana bill
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden, Sanders lead field in Iowa poll The 2020 Democratic nomination will run through the heart of black America Gillibrand says she's worried about top options in Dem 2020 poll being white men MORE (D-Ma.) said she is confident that Democrats would vote on a marijuana bill that would allow states to regulate marijuana without federal interference should they retake the Senate in November.

"I feel confident that if the Democrats recapture the Senate we’ll get a vote on this, and the vote will carry," Warren said in an interview with Rolling Stone of the bipartisan bill, which Warren co-sponsored. "I think we’ve got the votes for this." 

Warren said she has been pushing Republicans to convince Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump touts ruling against ObamaCare: ‘Mitch and Nancy’ should pass new health-care law Federal judge in Texas strikes down ObamaCare Ocasio-Cortez: By Lindsey Graham's 1999 standard for Clinton, Trump should be impeached MORE (R-Ky.) to relax his hard-line stance against the federal ban on marijuana. 

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The bill she is touting, the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, has stalled in the House despite support from 10 senators from both parties and 28 members of the House. 

"We’ve got plenty of colleagues on the Democratic side who will support this, and Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden, Sanders lead field in Iowa poll The Memo: Cohen fans flames around Trump Memo Comey used to brief Trump on dossier released: report MORE said it sounded like a good idea to him," Warren said. "He’s said it, I think, three different times now. So I’m pretty hopeful that if we could get a vote in Congress that we could actually get this passed."

Warren, a progressive who has been floated as a possible 2020 presidential contender, introduced the bill alongside Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSenators offer measure naming Saudi crown prince 'responsible' for Khashoggi slaying Can a rising tide of female legislators lift all boats? Setting the record straight about No Labels MORE (R-Colo.). 

"We've been bringing people on to our bill two by two, a little like Noah’s Ark," she said. "A Democrat and a Republican join hands and become cosponsors on our bill. We now have multiple cosponsors [in the Senate]. We have lots on the House side. In other words, we have a lot of people on McConnell’s team who are pushing McConnell to do this." 

The bill would amend the Controlled Substances Act to say it no longer applies to laws “relating to the manufacture, production, possession, distribution, dispensation, administration, or delivery of [marijuana]."

The Trump administration so far has taken a stance against marijuana legalization, with Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsInterior chief Zinke to leave administration Trump, Christie met to discuss chief of staff job: report Chief justice of California Supreme Court leaves GOP over Kavanaugh confirmation MORE, a legalization opponent, at the helm of the Justice Department.

Warren said his staunch opposition has mobilized Congress in favor of marijuana.

"Let me describe it this way: We are in a moment when Jeff Sessions highlighted aggressive law enforcement on marijuana and a lot of folks here in Congress looked at each other and said, ‘That’s a bad idea,’ " Warren said. "What Cory [Gardener] and I have done is give them a place to channel that where we can make real change. Now we just need to get a vote from Mitch [McConnell]."

Though marijuana is illegal at the federal level, recreational marijuana is legal in nine states and Washington, D.C., and medical marijuana is legal in another 29.

Democrats will face long odds in taking back the Senate, according to most political analysts.