Nixon White House counsel John Dean to testify at Kavanaugh hearing

Nixon White House counsel John Dean to testify at Kavanaugh hearing
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John Dean, who served as White House counsel during the Watergate scandal that ended Richard Nixon's presidency, is slated to testify next week at the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The Senate Judiciary Committee announced Dean's addition to the list of expected witnesses on Thursday, two days after releasing an initial list of witnesses including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Ohio Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate panel eyes vote on parks funding bills after key deadline Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens MORE (R), who are both set to testify on Kavanaugh's behalf.

Dean is among more than a dozen witnesses selected by Democrats on the Judiciary Committee. The former White House counsel "will speak about the abuse of executive power" during his appearance, according to Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinKavanaugh accuser Ramirez's attorney says Republicans were no-shows on scheduled call Dem senators slam GOP for announcing Kavanaugh vote ahead of Ford testimony Grassley to Feinstein: We won't delay Kavanaugh hearing MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the panel.

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Kavanaugh, who was nominated by President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: Dems playing destructive 'con game' with Kavanaugh Several Yale Law classmates who backed Kavanaugh call for misconduct investigation Freedom Caucus calls on Rosenstein to testify or resign MORE in June to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, faces a tough confirmation battle in the Senate amid questions over his views on whether a president can be investigated by a special counsel or held liable for criminal activity.

Dean's appearance at the hearing will likely address those questions specifically, as many have drawn parallels between the ongoing special counsel investigation headed by Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE probing Russian interference in the 2016 election and the independent counsel investigation led by Archibald Cox during Watergate.

Trump has escalated his attacks on the Mueller probe in recent weeks, which has secured a conviction for former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortDem warns Trump: 'Obstruction of justice' to fire Rosenstein Ex-White House official revises statement to Mueller after Flynn guilty plea: report Former White House lawyer sought to pay Manafort, Gates legal fees: report MORE and a guilty plea from former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

The president's criticism of the probe, coupled with speculation that he may fire Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHillicon Valley: State officials share tech privacy concerns with Sessions | Senator says election security bill won't pass before midterms | Instagram co-founders leave Facebook | Google chief to meet GOP lawmakers over bias claims On The Money: US trade chief casts doubt on Canada joining new deal | House panel invites Watt accuser to testify | Brady defends GOP message on tax cuts State officials press Sessions on tech privacy worries MORE after the midterm elections, has led to increased scrutiny of his Supreme Court nominee.

Some Democrats, including every minority member of the Judiciary Committee, have called for Kavanaugh's hearing to be delayed after Trump's longtime former lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty earlier this month to campaign finance violations and other charges, saying Trump was involved in a hush-money scheme during the 2016 election.

"Given the possibility of criminal wrongdoing by the President, doubts that Judge Kavanaugh believes a president can even be investigated, and the unprecedented lack of transparency regarding this nominee’s record, we should not move forward with hearings on September 4th," Democratic senators wrote last Friday.

Kavanaugh's hearing, which is set for Tuesday, is likely to also address concerns from Democrats over whether he believes Roe V. Wade, the landmark case that legalized a woman's right to an abortion, is settled law or could be revisited by the court.