Lieberman: McCain's vote against ObamaCare repeal was a vote against ‘mindless partisanship’

Lieberman: McCain's vote against ObamaCare repeal was a vote against ‘mindless partisanship’
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Former Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) on Saturday defended his friend and former colleague, the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us MORE (R-Ariz.), for voting against the Republican ObamaCare repeal last year.

Lieberman spoke during McCain’s funeral service at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday, saying the senator's notorious thumbs-down vote was a vote against "mindless partisanship."

“When John returned to the Senate after his surgery last summer and voted against the Republican health-care bill, some people accused him of being disloyal to his party and the president,” Lieberman said. “But that was not the case.”

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Lieberman said that the speech McCain gave that night showed his true intentions.

“That speech made clear that his vote was not against that bill but against the mindless partisanship that has taken control in both of our political parties and our government and produced totally one-sided responses to complicated national problems like health care.”

“And, of course, he was right,” Lieberman added.

McCain’s vote last July was one of three key votes against the bill, which was a legislative priority for the GOP.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE has frequently attacked McCain for voting against the Republican-backed bill which would have repealed ObamaCare, at rallies sometimes naming McCain but often referring to a "senator" who sank the bill.

"Except for one senator, who came into a room at 3 o’clock in the morning and went like that, we would have had health care too, we would have had health care too, think of that," Trump said in February, imitating the thumbs-down motion that McCain made during a late-night vote.

McCain died last Saturday at the age of 81 following a battle with brain cancer. 

Trump was not invited to his Saturday funeral service in Washington, D.C. 

The Trump administration was represented at the funeral by the president's daughter and adviser Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpEx-Trump, progressive strategists battle over charges of anti-Semitism surrounding Eric Trump Ethics watchdog requests probe into Trump officials traveling to campaign events Trump praises Arizona governor's pick of Jon Kyl to succeed McCain MOREJared KushnerJared Corey KushnerThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil Manafort’s plea deal — the clear winners and losers Five takeaways from Manafort’s plea deal MORE, Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense: Mattis dismisses talk he may be leaving | Polish president floats 'Fort Trump' | Dem bill would ban low-yield nukes Mattis dismisses reports of his exit: 'I love it here' Publisher says Woodward book sales largest in its history MORE, chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE and national security adviser John Bolton, as well as Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani.