McCain laid to rest in Annapolis

McCain laid to rest in Annapolis
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After a week of emotional and bipartisan celebrations commemorating the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote GOP, White House start playing midterm blame game Arizona race becomes Senate GOP’s ‘firewall’ MORE (R-Ariz.), the Senate giant has been laid to rest at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md.

McCain, who retired from the U.S. Navy at the rank of captain, was buried in a plot of land next to his Naval Academy classmate and lifelong friend Adm. Chuck Larson, who died of leukemia in 2014, The Associated Press reported. 

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Mourners and the senator's family walked behind a horse-drawn caisson carrying his casket from the Naval Academy chapel to the cemetery after the ceremony, the AP reported. Students from McCain's 1958 graduating class also joined.

McCain's son Jack McCain, Gen. David Petraeus and Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamKim, Moon toss ball to Trump in ‘last, best chance’ for Korean peace GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Collins: Kavanaugh accuser should 'reconsider,' testify on Monday MORE (R-S.C.) delivered remarks at the private ceremony.

Graham said before the service that he wanted to talk about how “nobody loved a soldier more than John McCain, that I bear witness to his commitment to have their back, travel where they go, never let them be forgotten,” according to the news service.

"I'm going to try to focus on the fact that I'm going to admit to what I have lost," Graham said Sunday morning on CNN's "State of the Union."  

Dozens of political power players from both parties gathered for a memorial service at the Washington National Cathedral on Sunday. Multiple speakers at the event made subtle swipes and references to President TrumpDonald John TrumpHannity urges Trump not to fire 'anybody' after Rosenstein report Ben Carson appears to tie allegation against Kavanaugh to socialist plot Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate MORE and the decline of civility in U.S. politics.