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Students march outside Collins Maine office to protest Kavanaugh confirmation

Students march outside Collins Maine office to protest Kavanaugh confirmation
© Greg Nash

A group of student protesters on Friday marched outside Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBipartisan, bicameral group unveils 8 billion coronavirus proposal The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms Biden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate MORE' (R-Maine) Maine office, demanding that she vote against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump alludes to possible 2024 run in White House remarks Trump threatens to veto defense bill over tech liability shield Tiger King's attorney believes they're close to getting pardon from Trump MORE's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh. 

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Videos posted on Twitter by a photojournalist from the Press Herald show students from Bowdoin College marching on their way to Collins's office to protest Kavanaugh's confirmation. 

The students carried signs that said, "Collins, Stand For Our Futures, #VoteNoOnKavanaugh" and "Keep Your Theocracy off my Democracy" while chanting "hey hey, ho ho, Kavanaugh has got to go." 

Collins has received considerable attention in recent weeks because of the significant vote she holds over Kavanaugh's confirmation. She has previously stated that she would not vote for a nominee who was “hostile” toward the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion.

Many Democratic lawmakers and progressive groups have argued that Kavanaugh's confirmation to the court would put the legislation in jeopardy. 

A crowdfunding campaign with the goal of having Collins vote against Trump's Supreme Court pick surpassed $1 million earlier this week. 

The “Be A Hero” campaign encouraged people to donate about $20 to a future Collins Democratic challenger if she votes to confirm Kavanaugh.

"I consider this quid pro quo fundraising to be the equivalent of an attempt to bribe me to vote against Judge Kavanaugh," Collins told conservative news outlet Newsmax. 

Collins and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPressure builds for coronavirus relief with no clear path to deal Bipartisan, bicameral group unveils 8 billion coronavirus proposal The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms MORE (R-Alaska) are seen as swing votes on the nominee due to the pair siding with Democrats in the past on issues such as abortion and ObamaCare. The Democrats would need two Republicans to join them in order to sink Kavanaugh's confirmation. 

Collins had a one-hour call with Kavanaugh on Friday, according to a spokesman for her office.

The call was scheduled before reports of sexual misconduct accusations against Kavanaugh surfaced. 

The New Yorker reported on Friday that a letter details an incident between Kavanaugh and an unknown woman when they were in high school. The magazine reported that a woman accused Kavanaugh of holding "her down and that he attempted to force himself on her."

Kavanaugh has released a statement denying this charge.