Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify

Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOvernight Energy: Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest| Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records| Trump's plan to boost ethanol miffs corn groups and the fossil fuel industry Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest Democrats can lose Trump impeachment battle and still win electoral war MORE (R-Alaska) said Monday that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman accusing him of sexual misconduct, Christine Blasey Ford, should both testify.

"Despite the length of time since the alleged incident, Dr. Ford's allegations should be heard and she must have an opportunity to present her story before the committee under oath, with Judge Kavanaugh having the opportunity to respond under oath as well," Murkowski said in a statement Monday.

"Allegations surrounding sexual assault must be taken seriously and the Judiciary Committee must look into this further," she said.

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Murkowski echoed Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing Susan Collins raises .1 million in third quarter Poll: 50 percent of Maine voters disapprove of Susan Collins's job performance MORE's (R-Maine) call earlier Monday for both parties to testify about the allegations under oath. 

Murkowski had said Sunday night that the Judiciary Committee "might" have to consider delaying the vote to confirm Kavanaugh, which was set for Thursday afternoon.

The vote's schedule has become uncertain after Ford went public with allegations that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and attempted to remove her clothes at a party in the early 1980s.

A variety of Republican Senators have suggested that the committee should dig into the allegations before they vote. 

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Turkey controversy Senators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security MORE (R-Mo.) was the first to broach the idea from the GOP on Monday.

Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong How to survive an impeachment Are Senate Republicans certain that Trump can return to office? MORE (Ariz.) and Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong George Conway hits Republicans for not saying Trump's name while criticizing policy Trump announces, endorses ambassador to Japan's Tennessee Senate bid MORE (Tenn.) also both called for the confirmation hearing not to proceed to a vote until senators talk to Ford.  

Both Kavanaugh and a lawyer for Ford have said the two parties are willing to testify before the committee. 

Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTrump's latest plan to boost ethanol miffs both corn groups and the fossil fuel industry Syria furor underscores Trump's isolation GOP braces for impeachment brawl MORE (R-Iowa) has resisted delaying the vote and is instead attempting to set up a call with Ford and Kavanaugh. 

Grassley has said that Democrats are refusing to take part in the call thus far. 

Republicans have criticized Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSchiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Syria fallout MORE (D-Calif.) for only bringing the allegations forward one week before the scheduled vote on Thursday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing Trump again vetoes resolution blocking national emergency for border wall Trump invites congressional leaders to meeting on Turkey MORE (R-Ky.) said in a statement Monday that the Democrats waited "until the 11th hour."

"They did not raise it in the closed session, the proper forum where such an allegation could have been addressed with discretion and sensitivity," McConnell said.

Neither Collins nor Murkowski have said how they will vote regarding Kavanaugh's confirmation.