Feinstein on Kavanaugh accusations: I don’t know if ‘everything is truthful'

Feinstein on Kavanaugh accusations: I don’t know if ‘everything is truthful'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrump administration urges Congress to reauthorize NSA surveillance program The Hill's Morning Report - More talk on guns; many questions on Epstein's death Juan Williams: We need a backlash against Big Tech MORE (D-Calif.) says she can't be sure of the veracity of everything alleged by the woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, though she later emphasized that she finds the witness "credible."

Feinstein told reporters on Capitol Hill that Christine Blasey Ford had been "profoundly impacted" by her experience, according to National Review, but added that she "can't say" if the allegations are "truthful."

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"[Ford] is a woman that has been, I think, profoundly impacted," she said, according to National Review.

"I'm the lead Democrat, so this is all up to the Republican side," Feinstein added in a video recorded by Fox News. "I can't say everything is truthful, I don't know, she continues."

Feinstein's office declined to comment to The Hill, pointing instead to her earlier remarks on Twitter. The senator expanded her remarks in later comments to CNN, calling Ford "credible," and calling for an investigation.

Her remarks came just minutes after the California Democrat tweeted that she found Ford, a professor at Palo Alto University in California, to be "sincere" and "believable" in her correspondence with Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, on which Feinstein is the ranking member.

"During every step of this process, I’ve found every single piece of information from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford eminently credible, sincere and believable," she wrote on Twitter.

"She knew this would have a huge effect on her life and she was incredibly brave to come forward," Feinstein added Tuesday afternoon.

Ford made headlines over the weekend by coming forward in a Washington Post interview and accusing Kavanaugh of holding her down, groping her and trying to remove her clothes at a party when they were both in high school. She said he muffled her screams for help with his hand.

The allegations threw a major roadblock in the way of his Supreme Court nomination, previously thought to be on track following the conclusion of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Kavanaugh has categorically denied the allegations, and the White House has shown no sign of halting his nomination despite calls from some Republicans, including Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeAnti-gun violence organization endorses Kelly's Senate bid Arpaio considering running for former sheriff job after Trump pardon Overnight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument MORE (Ariz.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: Insurance lobby chief calls Biden, Sanders health plans 'similarly bad' | Trump officials appeal drug price disclosure ruling | Study finds 1 in 7 people ration diabetes medicine due to cost Collins downplays 2020 threat: 'Confident' reelection would go well if she runs Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up' MORE (Maine), for Ford's allegations to be heard.