Booker: It would be ‘irresponsible’ not to consider running for president

Booker: It would be ‘irresponsible’ not to consider running for president
© Greg Nash

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerTrump neck and neck with top 2020 Democrats in Wisconsin: poll Booker says he will not make December debate stage White House makes push for paid family leave and child care reform MORE (D-N.J.) indicated in a new interview he is weighing a run for the White House in 2020, saying it would be "irresponsible" not to entertain the idea.

"Of course the presidency will be something I consider. It would be irresponsible not to," Booker said in a profile published Wednesday in New York Magazine.

Booker, who has long been considered one of the most likely Democrats to launch a presidential campaign, told the publication that his colleague and fellow potential presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAdvocacy groups decry Trump's 'anti-family policies' ahead of White House summit This bipartisan plan is the most progressive approach to paid parental leave Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' MORE (D-N.Y.) encouraged him to remain focused on positivity, as he has done in the past.

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“She said to me, ‘If you want to talk about love and kindness and decency, talk about those things, because it’s where you are,'" Booker said. "I feel like if I start poll-testing or shaping myself, where we start operating out of fear, I think that’s going to dim my light and my impact.”

Booker, Gillibrand and Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' On The Money: Lawmakers strike spending deal | US, China reach limited trade deal ahead of tariff deadline | Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst over new NAFTA Bill Weld: As many as six GOP senators privately support convicting Trump MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices | Senate confirms Trump FDA pick | Trump officials approve Medicaid work requirements in South Carolina Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Kamala Harris dropped out, but let's keep her mental health plan alive MORE (D-Calif.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director MORE (I-Vt.) are seen as among the most likely lawmakers to wade into the 2020 race. All have been staunch opponents of President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Vulnerable Democrats tout legislative wins, not impeachment Trump appears to set personal record for tweets in a day MORE's agenda.

Booker garnered the spotlight during Senate Judiciary Committee hearings earlier this month for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The New Jersey senator declared he was having a "Spartacus moment" when he said he intended to release documents that were deemed confidential.

Booker said he did so under threat from Senate Republicans, adding that he was breaking Senate rules by releasing the documents.

Conservatives were quick to mock the display, in part because a lawyer representing the George W. Bush administration, for which Kavanaugh worked, had already released the documents in question.